Using the Microsoft Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor

With the Windows 7 release on the horizon (October 22nd) many of you may be deciding whether to upgrade or not. If you are a Windows Vista user and you are not sure if your system is ready to run Windows 7, I suggest you download, install and run the Microsoft Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor. What I find puzzling about  the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor is that it is still in beta. I would have thought that Microsoft would have already had this utility finalized and ready to go; especially when the Windows 7 release date is closing in.  Maybe it will come out of beta as the release date nears.

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I tested the Upgrade Advisor on my Vista PC and it ran fine and ultimately gave me the Ok to upgrade. Personally, if you are using Windows Vista, I would stay with Windows Vista; especially now that the operating system has become much more stable with the Service Pack releases. Windows XP users can give this a try if you like; but, according to the Microsoft web site [ here ] ,they are advising XP users to experience Windows 7 on a new PC.  I find that hard to believe, especially when I have been reading that Windows 7 will run on many XP boxes.  Bottom-line, make sure you do your homework. If you do consider taking the upgrade path from Windows XP to Windows 7, I encourage you to follow the steps that are posted on the Microsoft website [ Link ] .

From my experience with operating system upgrades, something will mostly likely will give you a gray hair or two.  Upgrading the memory in your PC is always a plus in this type of scenario.

Prior to running the upgrade advisor, it is important that you plug in any USB devices (or other devices), such as external hard drives, scanners, printers, etc… that you are currently using with your Windows PC.

Here is what the upgrade advisor may tell you:

You’ll get a report telling you if your PC can run Windows 7 and if there are any known compatibility issues. If an issue can be resolved, you’ll get suggestions for next steps. For example, it may let you know that you need an updated driver for your printer and where to get it.

Just download, install, and run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor Beta. You’ll get a report telling you if your PC can run Windows 7 and if there are any known compatibility issues. If an issue can be resolved, you’ll get suggestions for next steps. For example, it may let you know that you need an updated driver for your printer and where to get it.

Reflected below are the Windows 7 – Minimum System Requirements (per the Microsoft Web site).  I have found from past experience, it is best to double (and even triple) their minimum requirements to get a half decent computing experience.  The computer may run with the specs they have reflected; however, it will most likely be the slowest gun in town.

If you want to run Windows 7 on your PC, here’s what it takes:

1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor

1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)

16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)

DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver

Additional requirements to use certain features:
  • Internet access (fees may apply)

Depending on resolution, video playback may require additional memory and advanced graphics hardware

For some Windows Media Center functionality a TV tuner and additional hardware may be required

Windows Touch and Tablet PCs require specific hardware

HomeGroup requires a network and PCs running Windows 7

DVD/CD authoring requires a compatible optical drive

BitLocker requires Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 1.2

BitLocker To Go requires a USB flash drive

Windows XP Mode requires an additional 1 GB of RAM, an additional 15 GB of available hard disk space, and a processor capable of hardware virtualization with Intel VT or AMD-V turned on

Music and sound require audio output

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4 thoughts on “Using the Microsoft Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor

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  1. Rick,
    Yes, I wonder at that too… still a beta? Makes no sense to me.

    Yes, if you are thinking about loading up your PC with Win 7 you should use this tool.

    Yes, there really is no reason to “upgrade” a Vista machine.

    Yes, if you are using a XP era computer, Win 7 may run on it, but you are far better off sticking with XP on that machine. If a new machine is possible, I believe you will like it and like Win 7.
    (They are on the 3rd generation of technology you probably don’t have.. like multiple cores and SATA. So.. )

    That’s my humble two cents on that.

    Nice article Rick, and well put.

    Like

    1. TechPaul,

      Always a pleasure to get your endorsement and added tips (comments). I appreciate you clarifying the “XP era computer” concern which I agree with you on. The keywords is “XP era computer”. I know quite a few people that are running supercharged 3rd generation PC’s (with multiple cores & SATA) with XP installed; due to the bad publicity on Vista. Vista has a come a long way and very stable in my opinion.

      As always, your comments, advice and opinions are very much appreciated here.

      Rick

      Like

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