Best Method I Found To Download, Organize and Archive Your Gmail

Recently I have been working to clear out my Gmail account to stay under the space quota I am allocated at Google. I am someone that saves every email that I send and receive. In my focus of accomplishing this task I recently posted two articles that may be helpful to people who are in the same boat I am in. Both of these articles will help you understand the Google process and what you need to do manage the FREE space you are allocated. Once you surpass the FREE space allocation, Google wants to “sell you” additional space at a subscription rate.

Understanding Your Google Account Online Space Allocations
(for Gmail, Google Drive and Google Photos)

How to “Bulk” Delete Old Emails in Gmail

One of the questions I had when I started this cleaning out process was is there a way to download and save my old Google Gmail emails?

Google will tell you to go to their “Google Takeout” site where you can select and download all of your data (not just emails). That may sound easy, but I have found is that Google packages up your data, whether it is photos or emails, and wraps up that data in downloadable zip files that lack no organization whatsoever and 99% of people will not understand how to do this anyway. Is this a tactic to push people toward buying more space?  Don’t know, but looks like a messy process to me and will only waste your time.

Best Method I Found To Download and Archive Your Gmail:

The method I use to download and archive my Gmail is a third party software application (that is FREE) called MailStore Home.

Continue reading “Best Method I Found To Download, Organize and Archive Your Gmail”

How to “Bulk” Delete Old Emails in Gmail

This is a great way to “bulk delete” (clean out) a Gmail account when you are near your allotted space limit. Thank you to Laptop Mag for these instructions.

In the search bar, you can type the date in a YYYY/DD/MM format to filter out emails before a certain date. If you type before:2014/01/1, you’ll see a list of all of the emails you received prior to Jan. 1, 2014.  You can also search by how old emails are. If you type older_than:1y, you’ll receive emails older than 1 year. You can use m for months or d for days, as well. If you want to delete them all, click the Check all box, then click “Select all conversations that match this search,” followed by the Delete button.

Source: How to Delete Old Emails in Gmail | Laptop Mag

Understanding Your Google Account Online Space Allocations (for Gmail, Google Drive and Google Photos)

When signing up for a Google account you get 15 GB of storage space in the cloud. That space is shared by Gmail, Google Drive and Photos. If you have a Google Account you can see what space these accounts are using by visiting google.com/settings/storage. Below is a screenshot of my account space allocations (after I had cleaned up things). If you notice I have 19 GB of storage. Somewhere along the line I had somehow acquired an additional 4 GB of space (to give me 19 GB, but I don’t remember what I did to get that).

Gmail will consume space if you send/receive a lot of email with attachments, but it takes years for see it is really impacting your allotted Google account space. I have been using Gmail since it inception (April 1, 2004) and I have used 9+ GBs. I will soon work on a strategy to backup those emails (to my computer) and back the account down to about a years worth of emails. Many people do not save emails, but I do. I will soon post an article on what you can do to backup your Gmail emails to your computer.

Google Drive, items that don’t take up space are: ​Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, Sites, and files in “Shared with me.” Other files that you store on Google Drive, such as PDF’s, videos, photos, and any file that is not a native Google file… are counted against your allotted space.

Google Photos is often the culprit of consuming Google Drive space because we take a lot of photos that auto upload from your smartphone; and, today’s smartphones take photos that are of “full resolution” quality that are large in file size. A workaround to this is that Google will allow you to store photos, unlimited for FREE, as long as you allow Google to take that “full resolution” quality photo and convert it to a “high quality” photo. To make sure you are allowing Google to make the conversion, on a computer, go to photos.google.com/settings. Make sure “High quality (free unlimited storage) is selected.

If you see that some of your photos is using space, you can click on “Recover Storage” and those photos that are accumulating space will be converted to “High quality” photos. I did this and took an hour or two before I noticed a difference in my drive space. I hadn’t even realized that I had photos (and videos) that were consuming drive space.

I hope what I posted here gives some insight on how Google manages and allocates your drive space. In summary, Gmail emails with large attachments will eat up space; files that are not created by or converted to the Google Doc file formats will eat up drive space; and, photos that you do not allow Google to convert to “high quality” will eat up drive space.


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Choose From Thousands Of FREE Microsoft Office Templates

Many folks do not know that Microsoft maintains, on their web site, pages of FREE Microsoft Office templates. There you will templates for resumes, cover letters, calendars, flyers, planners, newsletters, presentations, brochures, reports invoices and themes. I have found that many of these templates are compatible with third party office suites, such as LibreOffice.

Festive party flyer

Choose from thousands of free Microsoft Office templates for every event or occasion. Jump start your school, work, or family project and save time with a professionally designed Word, Excel, PowerPoint template that’s a perfect fit.

Source: Office templates & themes

Which One Is Your Favorite “Chromium Platform Browser”?

To you folks at home, I am sure you are very familiar with Google Chrome. Google Chrome is Google’s signature web browser; but, did you know that Google Chrome is a spin off of what is called Chromium. Chromium (as defined by Wikipedia) is “a Google-developed, free and open-source project whose source code can be compiled into a web browser”. There is actually a Chromium web browser.

As result of the Chromium platform being open source, other entities can freely use the source code to develop their own signature web browser platforms. For example, here at “What’s On My PC” I have installed on my computer (for testing purposes) Google Chrome, the new Microsoft Edge, Vivaldi and Brave. Each one of the these browsers are built off the source code of Chromium and if you install and test drive these browsers you will notice the similarities to that of Google Chrome; however, each of these browsers have unique features.

Which one is better? Actually, they are all very good and it is exciting to see these browsers in competition with each other. It really comes down to a matter of opinion and maybe loyalty. Maybe you love Google products, Microsoft products or you like the idea of Open Source products. Maybe you love additional features; want more privacy and security; you want faster;  or, like myself, you love trying new software applications.

Which one is my favorite??? At this point (and that can change at anytime), my favorite is the open source browser called BRAVE. What is catching my attention with BRAVE is the (to the naked eye) smoothness, clarity and speed; the more aggressive security and privacy protections; and, the seamless compatibility with the Google Chrome Store (to install my browser extensions).

What “Chromium Platform Browser” is your favorite? Feel free to comment….


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Learn “How to change default fonts settings on the new Microsoft Edge” @ Windows Central

Microsoft Edge is the new browser that you will eventually see attached to Windows 10. You can get it now as I reflected in a recent article “Did you know there is a NEW Microsoft Edge?“.

Here at What’s On My PC, I have been putting Edge through its’ paces and welcome any new tips. Here is an article from “Windows Central” that walks you through the process (very easy) of globally changing the font size and style.

Microsoft Edge includes settings to change the font size globally for all websites, including for settings. Also, the settings even allow you to specify the default font styles that the browser should use when a web page doesn’t provide this customization.

Microsoft Edge font settings

Learn How @ Windows Central

Learn Everything About Windows 10 With This FREE, COMPREHENSIVE, DOWNLOADABLE Tutorial Index

If you are looking for answers when it comes to Windows 10 or you simply want to learn more about Windows 10, do this… Visit this link (CLICK HERE) and you will be redirected to the “Windows TenForums” website (very reputable) where the site is featuring a “Windows 10 Tutorials Quick Reference Index” that is FREE, COMPREHENSIVE and being kept up-to-date. The really cool thing on their part is that they have made index downloadable, either as an Excel Spreadsheet, a PDF file or as a Google Sheet.

Source: Windows TenForums – Windows 10 Tutorials Quick Reference Index


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Did you know there is a NEW Microsoft Edge?

Eventually, you will see the NEW Microsoft Edge on your computer. For the people in the world of tech, this may be exciting news. For the people at home, changes like this cause anxiety (i.e. Now what???). Microsoft Edge is the web browser built into Windows 10. Most folks I work with at home have Google Chrome or Firefox installed due to the issues that were associated with Edge. Well, Microsoft has listened and there is now a NEW Microsoft Edge that is built off of, get this, the Chromium browser engine (or guts) which is the same distinct engine that Google Chrome is built off of. Keep in mind, Microsoft and Google are competitors in the world of tech, so this is interesting in that aspect. I am seeing, more and more, where the tech giants are sort of working together to help make our computer experiences more seamless.

I have played around with the NEW Microsoft Edge and I am impressed. I am impressed by the interface, the speed, the features, the security and most importantly (for me) that you can use the same browser extensions that you find in the Google Chrome Store. I also found in the settings that you will eventually be able to import your extensions from Google Chrome. You can, right now, import your bookmarks from other browsers easily.

If you don’t want to wait for the NEW Microsoft Edge to arrive on your computer, you can get it now by visiting the Microsoft Edge download site — CLICK HERE — . The download and install worked for me without a hitch. If you download and install Edge, you may be prompted to make Edge your default browser. You may want to skip over that until you have taken it for a spin. I think if you do, you will stand back and say, “Hey this is pretty good”…


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How To Make Text Bigger (or everything for that matter) On Your Windows 10 Computer

As I age here at “What’s On My PC”, my eyesight does not get any better. This tip here is most often requested by people (in my age group) whom I have assisted over the years.

To make the text bigger (or everything for that matter) on your Windows 10 Computer, do this:

To make just the text on your screen bigger, select Start Settings Ease of Access  > Display , then adjust the slider under Make text bigger. To make everything bigger, choose an option from the drop-down menu under Make everything bigger.

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Did you know that Chromebooks have an auto expiration date?

When buying a Chromebook it is a good idea to determine the “Auto Expiration Date”, for the model you purchased. The “Auto Expiration Date” is the date when you may stop receiving important updates (for new features and crucial security patches). Typically, Chromebooks have a minimum 5-year window of updates; but, I am now seeing that some of the new Chromebooks, produced in 2020, will have a minimum 8-year window of updates. I am also seeing various models, produced in the past, where Google has extended the window of time for receiving updates.

When a Chromebook reaches its’ “Auto Update Expiration” date you will receive a notification saying “This device will no longer receive the latest software updates. Please consider upgrading”. The Chromebook will continue to function but could become a security risk at that point.

You will often see older Chromebooks at bargain-basement prices, so be wary and check for the “Auto Expiration Date”.

So, how do you go about checking the “Auto Expiration Date” on a Chromebook?

The best answer I can give to that question is this. Visit Google’s “Auto Update Policy” site where you can look up your Chromebook Model to determine the expiration date; OR, If you are using a Chromebook with “Chrome Education Upgrade or Chrome Enterprise Upgrade”, the AUE date is available in the Google Admin console. According to this site, Google publishes a model’s AUE date on this page after its release, giving buyers time to make purchase decisions.

In closing, “Please check the AUE date when making a Chromebook purchasing decision”.


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Here is how to gain some screen space by “auto hiding” the Windows 10 Taskbar…

If you didn’t know, the “taskbar” is the bar that stretches across the bottom of your Windows 10 screen. It is typically visible, no matter where you are in Windows; but did you know you can make the taskbar “auto hide” itself? In other words, if you are not using it, the taskbar will drop down out of view, but if you want to make it re-appear you simply move your mouse pointer to the bottom of the screen and the taskbar will reappear. I currently have all of my PC’s to auto hide the taskbar to give me that extra screen space or view.

To activate “auto hide” in Windows 10″:

  1. Place your mouse pointer in a blank area of the taskbar and right mouse click.
  2. When the menu appears, click on “Taskbar settings” and the “Taskbar” settings window will appear.
  3. Toggle the switch “on” for “Automatically hide the taskbar in desktop mode”, then simply close the Window (and the “Taskbar” should now auto hide).


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