Understanding Your Google Account Online Space Allocations (for Gmail, Google Drive and Google Photos)

When signing up for a Google account you get 15 GB of storage space in the cloud. That space is shared by Gmail, Google Drive and Photos. If you have a Google Account you can see what space these accounts are using by visiting google.com/settings/storage. Below is a screenshot of my account space allocations (after I had cleaned up things). If you notice I have 19 GB of storage. Somewhere along the line I had somehow acquired an additional 4 GB of space (to give me 19 GB, but I don’t remember what I did to get that).

Gmail will consume space if you send/receive a lot of email with attachments, but it takes years for see it is really impacting your allotted Google account space. I have been using Gmail since it inception (April 1, 2004) and I have used 9+ GBs. I will soon work on a strategy to backup those emails (to my computer) and back the account down to about a years worth of emails. Many people do not save emails, but I do. I will soon post an article on what you can do to backup your Gmail emails to your computer.

Google Drive, items that don’t take up space are: ​Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, Sites, and files in “Shared with me.” Other files that you store on Google Drive, such as PDF’s, videos, photos, and any file that is not a native Google file… are counted against your allotted space.

Google Photos is often the culprit of consuming Google Drive space because we take a lot of photos that auto upload from your smartphone; and, today’s smartphones take photos that are of “full resolution” quality that are large in file size. A workaround to this is that Google will allow you to store photos, unlimited for FREE, as long as you allow Google to take that “full resolution” quality photo and convert it to a “high quality” photo. To make sure you are allowing Google to make the conversion, on a computer, go to photos.google.com/settings. Make sure “High quality (free unlimited storage) is selected.

If you see that some of your photos is using space, you can click on “Recover Storage” and those photos that are accumulating space will be converted to “High quality” photos. I did this and took an hour or two before I noticed a difference in my drive space. I hadn’t even realized that I had photos (and videos) that were consuming drive space.

I hope what I posted here gives some insight on how Google manages and allocates your drive space. In summary, Gmail emails with large attachments will eat up space; files that are not created by or converted to the Google Doc file formats will eat up drive space; and, photos that you do not allow Google to convert to “high quality” will eat up drive space.


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Use “Trace” To Remove The Background From Photos

Upload a photo to “Trace” and watch the magic happen. “Trace” will remove everything in a photo, except the main object. For example, photo one below is a photo with background that shows a skunk. After uploading to “Trace”, the skunk is now a skunk (with a transparent background) that can be singly used for other graphic creations. Here at “What’s On My PC” I have put “Trace” through its’ paces and it is awesome. The key is to use photos where there is a main object in the photo. I have had fun with “Trace” where I use “Google Drawings” as my graphic editor to merge my creations.

 

Source: Trace | Remove background from images fast | Sticker Mule Canada

How To Backup Microsoft OneNote Notebooks

If you use Microsoft OneNote and have squirreled away a ton of data you may want to have a backup plan in place. Built into the “web version” of OneNote there is an option to import and export your notebooks. No matter what version of OneNote you use, you can download a copy of any of your OneNote notebooks to your PC or Mac — either as a backup or to upload its contents to another account. In summary, you select a notebook you want to backup and you can export the notebook in a zip file format to your hard drive. To restore a notebook from the backup, you have to unzip the backed up zip file and the notebook is revealed. At that point, you use the online import tool (see source link below) to import it back into your online notebook storage area.

In detail, here is how to export and import OneNote Notebooks: Continue reading “How To Backup Microsoft OneNote Notebooks”

How to Update From Windows 7 & 8 to Windows 10 for Free – MajorGeeks

If you follow the source link below you will be taken to the MajorGeeks site where there are instructions on how to upgrade to Windows 10 using a Powershell Script or manually. The manual option may be the way to go for home users. Appears this has been developed by MajorGeeks; but, not tested here at “What’s On My PC”… That is not to say this will not work. MajorGeeks is a very reputable software distribution site and if I needed to upgrade, I would give this a try. Just back up your personal files…

Windows 7 to Windows 10 Silent Upgrade PowerShell Script is a free PowerShell script that should allow anyone to upgrade Windows 7 to Windows 10 for free silently.

Source: Download How to Update From Windows 7 & 8 to Windows 10 for Free – MajorGeeks

How to Set Up and Use Linux Apps on Chromebooks (video by Gauging Gadgets)

Here is an excellent video, by Gauging Gadgets, that will get you started in using Linux Apps on your Chromebook. One thing I want to point out is that if you have an older Chromebook, you may not have the ability to run Linux apps. This is pointed out in the video and you will be shown how you can tell if this feature is available on your Chromebook or not. If you do not own a Chromebook and would like to explore what Chromebooks are available, how much, etc… then CLICK HERE to see what is currently listed at Amazon.


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Here is How To Setup Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides For Offline Use

I find that most folks at home are unaware that Google has its’ own office suite that is FREE; and, can be used even when the computer is not connected to the internet (see setup instructions below). Why spend a ton of money on Microsoft Office when you are not a power user; you no longer need it for work or school; and, all you are doing is typing the occasional letter or even doing a basic spreadsheet? Also, the components of Google’s office suite does a pretty good job reading Microsoft Office files.

Google Docs Icons

Anyhow, if interested, here are the setup instructions on “How To Setup Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides For Offline Use” that I captured from Google’s support site. Continue reading “Here is How To Setup Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides For Offline Use”

How to use your Chromebook’s Touchpad…

You can use your Chromebook’s touchpad to right-click, switch between tabs, and more. Here’s how it works:

Tap here to see an interactive tutorial

Move the pointer Move your finger across the touchpad.
Click Press or tap the lower half of the touchpad.
Right-click Press or tap the touchpad with two fingers. You can also press Alt, then click with one finger.
Scroll Place two fingers on the touchpad and move them up and down to scroll vertically, or left and right to scroll horizontally.
Move between pages To go back to a page you were just on, swipe left with two fingers. To go forward to a page you were just on, swipe right with two fingers.
See all open windows Swipe up or down with three fingers.

If you have Australian scrolling turned on, swipe up. If you have traditional scrolling turned on, swipe down.

Close a tab Point to the tab, then tap or click the touchpad with three fingers.
Open a link in a new tab Point to the link, then tap or click the touchpad with three fingers.
Switch between tabs If you have multiple browser tabs open, swipe left and right with three fingers.
Drag and drop Using one finger, click and hold the item you want to move. Drag the item to its new spot, then release your finger.

Learn how to add a “real” search box to Google Chrome’s New Tab Page (at gHacks)

You may have noticed that when Google Chrome’s “new tab” page loads there is a search box; but when you go to type into the search box it will default to the address bar at the top of the page. To me, not normal and sort of takes away from the real purpose of the page. This has been an ongoing pet peeve of mine and today at “gHacks” I learned how to turn that search box into a functional search box (like it should be).

If you find this bothersome, as well, click on the link below to get the fix.

Add a “real” search box to Google Chrome’s New Tab Page – gHacks Tech News

Watch Your Wallet — Avoid These 3 Money Scams | The Motley Foll

This is a “must read”… Motley Fool briefs you on 3 money scams that are tied to “Taxes”, “Social Security” and “Medicare”. I have a motto here at What’s On My PC and it is “believe nothing, verify everything”.  You can learn more by clicking the source link below.

The more you learn about scams and scamming techniques, the less likely you’ll be to fall for them. As you go through your financial life, saving, investing, paying taxes, collecting benefits, getting healthcare, and so on, be alert for those who want to take advantage of your hard work.

We see lots of criss-crossed yellow signs that say scam alert.

Source: Watch Your Wallet — Avoid These 3 Money Scams


Learn more about “Scams” 

Scam Me If You Can: Simple Strategies to Outsmart Today’s Rip-off Artists

As one of the world’s most respected authorities on the subjects of fraud, forgery, and cybersecurity, Frank Abagnale knows how scammers work. In Scam Me If You Can, he reveals the latest tricks that today’s scammers, hackers, and con artists use to steal your money and personal information–often online and over the phone. Using plain language and vivid examples, Abagnale reveals hundreds of tips, including:

• The best way to protect your phone from being hacked
• The only time you should ever use a debit card
• The one type of photo you should never post on social media
• The only conditions under which you should use WiFi networks at the airport
• The safest way to use an ATM


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What’s On My PC

How to build a PC: A step-by-step guide (at Windows Central) and a Book To Get You Started

Building a PC remains a daunting endeavor for many, but it doesn’t have to be. Even if you’ve yet to pick up a screwdriver and toss together a few components, this comprehensive guide will make you a PC building master in no time at all.

Learn How @ Windows Central


Need more information on building a computer? Check out the following publication available at Amazon…

How to Build a Computer: The Best Beginner’s Guide to Building Your Own PC From Scratch! 

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