Daily Deal: Kingston 240GB A400 SATA 3 2.5″ Internal SSD

If you have an old laptop around that you want to breath new life into, the Kingston 240GB A400 SATA 3 2.5″ Internal SSD (solid state hard drive) will do just that. Great buy on this…

Kingston 240GB A400 SATA 3 2.5″ Internal SSD

 

  • Make sure this fits by entering your model number.
  • Fast start-up, loading, and file transfers
  • More reliable and durable than a hard drive
  • Multiple capacities with space for applications or a hard drive replacement

More SSD Options

How to use Windows 10’s Cloud Download Recovery Feature? | Windows101Tricks

In 2020, Windows 10 is getting a new feature that will allow users where they can download their operating systems from the cloud and increase the speed of a recovery process. This new cloud recovery or cloud reinstall feature is going to be very useful for Windows 10 users and will make the life of the user with the high-speed internet connection super simple.

Cloud Download

Continue Reading @ Windows101Tricks


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How to Scan and Fix Hard Drives with CHKDSK in Windows 10 | TechJunkie

The CHKDSK (Check Disk) command has been around since the beginning of computers. Below is some quoted text from a website called TechJunkie where I found an excellent writeup on CHKDSK and how to use it. To read the full article, click on the source link at the end of this post.

chkdsk windows 10

Because CHKDSK has been updated and upgraded repeatedly with each new generation of storage hardware, the program continues to work correctly to analyze and repair hard drives of any sort, even on the most modern OSes and using the most advanced drive technologies.

The same process that used to be executed to analyze a floppy disk holding 160K, can today be executed to analyze a solid-state, all-electronic SSD holding 15 terabytes.

Millions of Windows 10 users still have mechanical hard drives in their PCs. To keep them healthy and to help investigate any unusual behavior, try the venerable CHKDSK command. Here’s how to…

Source: How to Scan & Fix Hard Drives with CHKDSK in Windows 10

Five Comprehensive Lists of Uninstallers (removal tools) For Common Windows Antivirus and Malware Software Products

After a conversation with a seasoned tech on the What’s On My PC Facebook page about our thoughts on Antivirus Software, for which we decided is the biggest scam in the industry, I went on the hunt to find antivirus and malware uninstallers. Why? Most people at home do not know that these antivirus and malware software installations are very comprehensive in their very nature and are not the same as installing or uninstalling normal software. Also, a common practice I have seen, as well as the tech on Facebook I was conversing with, the home-based computer user will often let a subscription run out and then install another antivirus product right on top of the other. This is a big “NO NO”; unless the antivirus or malware product you intend to install specifically states that their product can co-exist with another. Installing another antivirus or malware product on top of another will cause problems to surface and will slow down your computer.

It is important that any previously installed antivirus or Malware software is uninstalled from your system before installing another product. Typical uninstallation using the Windows removal tools (Add/Remove Programs) is often not enough to completely clean your computer.

whatsonmypc logo 2019

This is where this list of uninstallers comes into play. Typically if you have a specific product installed that you want to uninstall, you would go to the products web site and locate their uninstaller. The problem I have experienced with this is that they bury the uninstaller in the site, making it difficult to locate because they don’t want to lose you as a paying customer.

Continue reading “Five Comprehensive Lists of Uninstallers (removal tools) For Common Windows Antivirus and Malware Software Products”

One of the best guides I found to remove Trojans, Viruses, Worms and Malware from a Windows PC…

I have been messing with Windows-based computers since the mid to late 1980s. I am no expert and never attest to being one; but, I am adept to finding answers and solutions to computer problems through the power of the internet. As I continue to get up in age, my ability to retain what to do in various troubleshooting scenarios is not as sharp as it once was and much of that has to do with the fact that I am no longer working in IT (now retired). I still on occasions will try to help a neighbor or family member and most of those occasions it is to help bail them out from a browser hijack situation or situation where malware or a virus has infected their PC’s; but, in all reality I try to avoid this stuff like the plague (due that it can be quite a time-consuming process).

Today after assisting a neighbor, I started thinking, what is a good “current process” to follow and what software should one use to clean a Windows PC that has been infected? I went to the internet and came across a step-by-step guide that explains how to remove Trojans, Viruses, Worms and Malware from a Windows PC at a website called MalwareTips (see source link below)… Rick @ What’s On My PC 

Continue reading “One of the best guides I found to remove Trojans, Viruses, Worms and Malware from a Windows PC…”

Build A Complete Tech Toolbox With WSCC (aka Windows System Control Center)

by KLS SOFT

If you are a computer tech, WSCC is something that you may want to include in your arsenal of tech tools. WSCC supports the commandline utility tools from the Sysinternals Suite and NirSoft. I also noticed that other utilities can also be installed into the WSCC platform that are included in Windows and from a developer called MiTec. Digging deeper into the settings options it appears you can also install and add your own utilities.

From the WSCC platform, you can install, update, execute and organize these utilities effortlessly. In other words, WSCC is a launcher that will assist you in managing these utilities from one location, making it easy to find and launch the tool that you specifically need. The portable edition (which I recommend) does not require installation and can be run directly from a USB drive… — Rick @ What’s On My PC

Download Here


More “Downloads”

 

Software Selection for 08/03/2019 – Microsoft Windows and Office ISO Downloader Tool 8.16

Microsoft Windows and Office ISO Downloader Tool 8.16

Source: FreewareFiles

Screenshot for: Microsoft Windows and Office ISO Downloader Tool 8.16

Microsoft removed the disk images of its Windows operating system from Digital River, making it difficult to get untouched ISO files. Now, you can now use Microsoft Windows ISO Downloader Tool to easily download genuine disk images for Windows 10, 8.1 and 7. Additionally, you can download Office images for Windows and Mac. The handy software connects directly to Microsoft’s server.


Click Here For More Software

Quick Tip: Did you know that the Google Chrome browser has a built-in task manager?

Google Chrome has a built-in task manager that will help you troubleshoot what tabs and extensions are causing issues. From the task manager, you can kill or end those processes that may assist you in troubleshooting what may be the culprit. Very, very seldom have I had to use the task manager, but is good to know it is there when things start slowing down.

You can quickly get to the task manager in Google Chrome by hitting the “Shift+Esc” keys together on your keyboard. You can also get to the task manager by accessing Chrome’s menu by clicking on the three dots at the top right corner of the browser, then “more tools”, then “task manager”.

Quick Tip: Don’t Panic If Your Internet Service Is Disrupted; Be Prepared

Recently, during the evening hours, I lost my internet service connection. Our internet is provided by the local cable company and has been exceptionally dependable. Initial reboots/resets of my modem and router failed to recover the service. My gut instinct told me this was not a typical loss of service. Many folks in my neighborhood also lost their digital phone service, which caused panic to set in. I later learned the attack affected over 40 percent of their customer base (including businesses). After several days, the service was eventually restored. The culprit was a  “malicious and targeted attack from outside our network,” in a DDos attack (distributed denial of service) where the service was intentionally flooded with data sent simultaneously from many individual computers. I knew something to this effect was going on due that it got to a point I could reboot the equipment and regain service for a short period of time; then, it would drop out again.

Image result for ddos meaning

All in all, when done, and the service was restored, I learned some things:

DON’T PANIC… We live in a digital world that we are dependent on, where the source of service if attacked, can bring down the whole house, affecting many people and many types of internet-connected devices. BE PREPARED… Learn how to reboot your equipment.  Communicate with the neighbors or family to determine if they have service. A cell phone, in this case for many people, provided phone AND internet service. If you have a neighbor who has no cell phone, be the good neighbor. Follow the local news to see if it is widespread. Learn where (online) you can determine the status of the network you are connected to. In my case, I used my cell phone to get updates online from the cable company, instead of calling them on their overwhelmed customer service lines. I then passed this information on to my neighbors. When the service is restored, help each other to get the equipment back up and running. I ended up helping others reset their modems and testing to make sure they had their phone and internet service back; thus, saving them the expense of a service call (which may have taken days to get an onsite response).

In the end, I think what bothered me the most was seeing sneering comments online where people were complaining of the service going down. Having managed a computer network for a government agency, I had visions of IT people working (24/7) stressing out over this to bring back service; which, they eventually did. Also, this is concerning from the standpoint, and has to be questioned, “Is our country really prepared for these cyber attacks and is the proper funding being provided to provide the necessary defense measures?”.

Source: Antietam Broadband says all service back after widespread outage

 

 

 

Chromebook Support Sites and Phone Number

Here is a handy list of Chromebook support sites and phone numbers…

Google Chromebook (Googles Main Help Site)

Acer help site | (866) 695-2237

ASUS help site | Chat with us | (888) 678-3688

Chromebook Pixel (2013 & 2015) | Request a call

Dell help site | (800) 624-9897

Google Pixelbook Help Center | Contact support

Google Pixel Slate Help Center | Contact support

Haier help site | (877) 337-3639

Hisense help site | (888) 935-8880

HP help site | (800) 474-6836

Lenovo help site | (800) 426-7378

LG help site | (800) 243-0000

Samsung help site | Chat with us | (800) 726-7864

Toshiba help site | (800) 457-7777

If your computer won’t start, don’t panic (yet)…

What to Do When Your Computer Won’t Start | PCMag.com

What to Do When Your Computer Won't Start

Been there and done it; from both ends of the spectrum.  Have assisted people where panic set in because their computer would not start; and to be honest, I have felt that despair when my own computer did not start.  Sort of does something to you, but always remember, the sun will still come up tomorrow.

Click on the source link below at PCMag to get a good rundown of what to do (try) when your computer fails to start.

Source: What to Do When Your Computer Won’t Start | PCMag.com

Windows 10 Recovery Troubleshooting Guide

I pulled this Windows 10 recovery troubleshooting guide, links and all, directly from Microsoft’s website that is very helpful in determining what recovery option to pursue when Windows 10 starts to go belly up or has went belly up (and won’t start) .

If you’re having problems with your PC, the following table can help you decide which recovery option to use. For help with black screen or blue screen errors, see Troubleshoot black screen problems or Troubleshoot blue screen errors.

 Problem  See this section
Your PC isn’t working well and you recently installed an app. Restore from a system restore point
Your PC isn’t working well and you recently installed an update. Remove an installed Windows update
Your PC isn’t working well and it’s been a while since you installed an app, driver, or update. Reset your PC
Your PC won’t start and you’ve created a recovery drive. Use a recovery drive to restore or reset your PC
Your PC won’t start and you haven’t created a recovery drive. Use installation media to restore or reset your PC
Your PC won’t start, you haven’t created a recovery drive, and resetting your PC didn’t work. Use installation media to reinstall Windows 10
You want to reinstall your previous operating system. Go back to your previous version of Windows

Source: Recovery options in Windows 10

PingInfoView – Ping to multiple host names/IP addresses

One way to test the reachability of a host on the internet is to “ping” the IP address of the host or the hostname (i.e. http://www.google.com). When you perform a ping, it measures the round-trip time for the message to be echoed back to your computer.

A nice little utility, with a GUI, is PingInfoView by NirSoft. PingInfoView is a small utility that allows you to easily ping multiple host names and IP addresses, and watch the result in one table. It automatically pings to all hosts every number of seconds that you specify, and displays the number of successful and failed pings, as well as the average ping time. You can also save the ping result into text/html/xml file, or copy it to the clipboard.

Source: PingInfoView – Ping to multiple host names/IP addresses

MiniTool Partition Wizard Free 10.2.1 – An Editor’s Choice At DownloadCrew

This FREE partition tool gives you more flexibility (and more options) in comparison to the partition tool that is baked into Windows. For example, an option jumping out at me, that is not a windows option, is that there is a tool for wiping a partition securely, allowing you to delete the data from it (to the point that the data cannot be recovered by any data recovery solution). Other numerous options are reflected in the screenshot below…

MiniTool Partition Manager

MiniTool Partition Wizard Free 10.2.1: Quickly create, delete, resize and even copy a partition using this drive tool

Source: MiniTool Partition Wizard Free 10.2.1 – Downloadcrew

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