Daily Deal: ON SALE NOW – NEW Norton 360 Deluxe – Antivirus software for 3 Devices with Auto Renewal

ONGOING PROTECTION Download instantly & install protection for up to 3 PCs, Macs, iOS or Android devices in minutes! REAL-TIME THREAT PROTECTION Advanced security that helps defend against existing and emerging malware to your devices, and helps protect your private and financial information when you go online. SECURE VPN – Browse anonymously and securely with a no-log VPN. Add bank-grade encryption to help keep your information like passwords and bank details secure and private.

NEW Norton 360 Deluxe
Antivirus software for 3 Devices with Auto-Renewal

Source: Amazon – NEW Norton 360 Deluxe – Antivirus software for 3 Devices with Auto Renewal


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Microsoft Cautions Against Installing the Latest Windows 10 Update | Digital Trends

For folks at home… This does not apply and only applies to “Microsoft’s enterprise-based customers”.


Before going on a red alert, this issue pertains to Microsoft’s enterprise-based customers. Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection is a paid service for detecting, investigating, and responding to “advanced threats.” It’s built into Windows 10 but unrelated to the Windows Security platform found in Windows 10 Home and Pro.

Continue Reading @ Digital Trends


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Windows Defender’s Tamper Protection Rolling Out To Windows 10 (v1903)

From what I am reading the “tamper protection” feature was actually launched last December (for business customers) and is now being rolled out to Windows 10 computer user’s at home that are running Windows 10 v1903.

At the time of this posting, I checked my Windows Defender software on my PC and have not seen anything thus far to indicate “tamper protection” has rolled out to my PC.

Tamper Protection, as the name suggests, protects certain security features from tampering. One of the barriers that Tamper Protection puts in place around security features blocks manipulations of setting changes that are made outside of the official Settings application. Attackers may attempt to disable real-time protections or certain security features and Tamper Protection was designed to prevent these changes from being made successfully. — Source: gHacks

More Tech News

4-Four Simple Tips To Help You Stay Protected Online

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.  To help you stay protected online, here are 4-four simple tips to follow:

  1. Use our Mobile Banking app so that you can stay on top of any suspicious account activity.
  2. Protect your devices by installing the latest browsers, operating systems and antivirus software.
  3. Don’t provide account or personal information via email, text or to an unsolicited caller.
  4. Don’t click on unsolicited links or attachments sent via email or text.

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FREE Google Chrome Browser Protection From Microsoft

Microsoft now offers a layer of protection for Google Chrome through a browser extension called ‘Windows Defender Browser Protection“. If you are particularly concerned about malicious links then this extension will provide an extra safeguard.

The Windows Defender Browser Protection extension helps protect you against online threats, such as links in phishing emails and websites designed to trick you into downloading and installing malicious software that can harm your computer.

If you click a malicious link in an email or navigate to a site designed to trick you into disclosing financial, personal or other sensitive information, or a website that hosts malware, Windows Defender Browser Protection will check it against a constantly updated list of malicious URLs known to Microsoft.

If the malicious link matches one on the list, Windows Defender Browser Protection will show a red warning screen letting you know that the web page you are about to visit is known to be harmful, giving you a clear path back to safety with one click.

Source: Windows Defender Browser Extension For Google Chrome

VeraCrypt – FREE Open Source Encryption Software

VeraCrypt is FREE open-source disk encryption software that is used by those who have a need to lock down data from prying eyes. There are many options to using Veracrypt from simply creating a virtual encrypted disk within a file and mounting it as a real disk (or drive) TO encrypting an entire partition or storage device such as USB flash drive or hard drive. If you are looking for encryption software, at no cost, that is as good or better than commerical encryption software, this is it…

Image result for veracrypt screenshot

VeraCrypt never saves any decrypted data to a disk – it only stores the data temporarily in RAM (memory). Even when the volume is mounted, data stored in the volume is still encrypted. When you restart Windows or turn off your computer, the volume will be dismounted and files stored in it will be inaccessible (and encrypted). Even when power supply is suddenly interrupted (without proper system shut down), files stored in the volume are inaccessible (and encrypted).

Veracrypt is currently available on the following platforms: Windows, Mac OSX, Linus AND third party support on Android and iOS. It can also be downloaded and run as a portable app…

Source: VeraCrypt – Free Open source disk encryption with strong security for the Paranoid


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Software at Amazon

172 malicious apps with 335M+ installs found on Google Play | The Next Web

I have a motto here at “What’s On My PC”… The motto is, when it comes to the world of computing, “Trust Nothing, Verify Everything”…

This article at “The Next Web” is an eye opener. I strongly urge when downloading apps from the online stores that you closely look at what the app wants to access on your device,, the reviews, if ad-supported, where developed, etc… In other words, do a bit of research.

Google desperately needs to curb the spread of Android malware. In September alone, researchers uncovered a total of 172 infected apps on the Play Store. The worst part? These apps had racked up over 335 million installs by the time they were detected by security experts.

Continue Reading @ The Next Web

Tech News: Malware discovered in Google Play app with over 100 million downloads

by TechSpot

Kaspersky researchers reported that the app in question was CamScanner, “a phone-based PDF creator that includes OCR (optical character recognition.” The report notes that CamScanner was a legitimate app with no malicious intentions. Like other applications, the developers displayed ads and offered in-app purchases to make money. “However, at some point, that changed, and recent versions of the app shipped with an advertising library containing a malicious module,” writes the researchers.

Read More @ TechSpot


More “Tech News”

BEWARE – NEW Taxpayer’s Email Scam

by Homeland Security – CISA

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has issued a warning about a new email scam in which malicious cyber actors send unsolicited emails to taxpayers from fake (i.e., spoofed) IRS email addresses. The emails contain a link to a spoofed IRS.gov website that displays fake details about the targeted recipient’s tax refund, return, or account. The emails instruct the recipient to access their refund information by entering a provided password on the spoofed website. By entering the password, the victim unintentionally downloads malware that could enable the malicious cyber actors to take control of the affected system or obtain sensitive information.

Source: IRS Warns of New Email Scam | CISA

Microsoft Patches Two Critical Windows 10 Security Flaws | Digital Trends

If you’re running any version of Windows 10, you should update your computer as soon as possible. Microsoft recently alerted users that it patched two critical remote code execution (RCE) “wormable” vulnerabilities, which could have allowed hackers to spread malware to both your — and others — PCs without your knowledge or any interaction.

Source: Microsoft Patches Two Critical Windows 10 Security Flaws | Digital Trends

Windows Defender Gets Perfect Scores in Antivirus Test | Tom’s Hardware

Windows Defender is the default antivirus software that comes pre-installed on Windows 10 and is the antivirus software that I use here at “What’s On My PC”. The best part is that it is FREE!

Performance issues, privacy concerns, and other problems make it harder than ever to recommend third-party antivirus solutions on Windows. Now it’s about to become even more difficult: TechSpot reported that AV-Test, an independent organization that evaluates security products, gave Windows Defender perfect scores across its three evaluation categories after testing 20 antivirus products made for Windows 10 throughout May and June

Read More @ Tom’s Hardware

Quick Tip: Conceal Your Browsing Habits By Going Incognito In Google Chrome

As you know, browsing with Google Chrome or any browser for that matter, your privacy is compromised to the degree that your browsing habits, etc… leave tracks as to where you have been. This is typically done via cookies (that identifies the user when you visit specific sites) and via your browsing history. This is all fine and dandy to a certain point, but there may be occasions where you do not want this information stored and want to protect your identity.

The solution to this problem, on those certain occasions, is to go “incognito”. If you look up in the dictionary, “incognito” is defined as “having one’s true identity concealed”. Nearly all browsers give you the ability to go into “incognito” mode, but for the sake of this article, I am going to tell you how to get into “incognito” mode using Google Chrome. It is very, very easy…

Simply click the vertical three-dot icon on the top-right of the browser and select “New incognito window.” On mobile, tap the three-dot icon on the bottom-right (iOS) or top-right (Android) and select “New incognito tab.” That is it, simple as that… In Google Chrome, when in incognito mode you will see a darkened browser background and you will obviously see “You’ve gone incognito”. You can also get into “incognito” mode by hitting “Ctrl+Shift+N” in combo, on your keyboard.

Now, something I do want to point out. This does give you some privacy protection to a certain point, but do not think this is keeping you from being seen at work. Incognito mode only is concealing your behavior. On work networks, the network administrator, if necessary can track unusual activity via a workstations or devices IP address.

 

Quick Tip: How To Quickly Lock Your Windows 10 Computer

When I was managing a computer network and teaching others, one of the first things I would teach people is how to lock their computer when they walked away from the computer for an extended period of time. In the work environment, this is especially important from a privacy and security perspective.

Image result for computer lock

With Windows 10 the easiest method is to hit the Windows Key + L . When you return to your computer to start working again you will be required to enter your password or pin.

A more modern automated method is also available in Windows 10 and it is called “Dynamic Lock” where you can pair your PC and your Smartphone via bluetooth; providing, your computer is bluetooth ready. You can setup “Dynamic Lock” by going to Start > Settings > Accounts > Sign-in options

Quick Tip: Lock Down Your Android Smartphone For Peace of Mind

Nothing is more distressing than losing your phone or thinking it has been stolen. For peace of mind, as soon as you set up your new phone, take a moment and lock it down by configuring the lock screen. Most phones during the initial set up prompt you through a process to lock down your phone, either via a PIN, pattern, password, fingerprint and/or facial recognition. My phone, I have set up to use a combination of these, with the fingerprint recognition I feel is the most powerful. My phone also allowed me to pick a 6-digit PIN, which I feel really makes it tougher to overcome.

9-hints-to-secure-your-mobile-phone

If by chance you skipped over the process to secure your phone when you initially set it up or you desire to modify the current settings, you can do this by heading to the system settings. The system settings on most phones can be accessed via an app icon (labeled “system settings or settings”) or by pulling down from the top of the screen and tapping on a “cogged gear icon”. From the system settings, you are looking for the Security Menu. The menus and options may slightly vary from phone to phone but look for anything that is related to “security” and once there you should see various options to lock down your phone.

Just do it for peace of mind… These phones are computers in our pockets and contain a mother load of personal information.

 

 

Quick Tip: How To Find, Lock Or Erase A Stolen or Lost Android Device

There is nothing more distressful than losing your smartphone… If you own an Android device, such as a smartphone, tablet or Chromebook, you most likely performed the initial set up using a Google Account (i.e. Gmail account). As a result, you have a feature where you can remotely find, lock or erase the device in the event the phone is stolen or lost (Note: The phone must be turned “on” in order for this to work). You can even ring the phone and send information to the phone requesting that the phone be returned. You will need to go to a computer, log into your Google account, in order to make this work. Follow the steps below to put you on the road of recovery. You can go ahead and practice this…

  1. Open a browser, like Chrome Chrome. If you’re using someone else’s device, use private browsing mode.
  2. Open your Google Account.
  3. In the “Security” section, select Find a lost or stolen phone.
  4. Select the lost phone, tablet, or Chromebook.
  5. Follow the step-by-step suggestions to help find and secure the device.

ADDED TIP: Also, did you know, if you have a Google Account, and you are logged in, you can perform a Google Search, type in “Find My Phone” and Google (with a map) will find your phone within about 50 feet.

10 Tips to Keep Your Online Bank Account Secure | Make Use Of

I encourage my readers to visit “Make Use Of” (source link below) to learn 10 tips to keep your online bank account secure. One of the tips that jumped out at me is that it is safer to log into your bank account using the bank’s app on your smartphone (through your cellular service), versus accessing your bank account from your desktop or laptop computer which is more susceptible to malicious attack.

Online Banking Mobile App

Switching to online banking comes with some security risks. These tips explain how to keep your online bank account safe.

Source: 10 Tips to Keep Your Online Bank Account SecureT

Quick Tip: How To Go Incognito In Google Chrome

I bet you did not know you could go “Incognito” in Google Chrome, where your browsing history and cookies are not stored, where your privacy is protected? Typically, when browsing the web your browser tracks you with cookies. Have you ever noticed when looking for a specific product that this product or products in similarity start popping up in the ads? If you were in “incognito mode” this would not occur. Chrome won’t save your browsing history, cookies and site data, or information entered in forms while in incognito mode. In other words, your “activity” is not tracked and stored.

How do you get to “incognito mode” in Google Chrome?

It is actually very simple. To open an incognito window in Chrome, click the three-dot icon on the top-right corner of the browser and select “New incognito window.” You can also get into “incognito mode” by using the keyboard shortcut of Ctrl+Shift+N (while Google Chrome is open).

Please know, that “incognito mode” does not hide the sites you visit from your place of employment, your internet service provider, etc… Even though your browsing history is private, on the computer that you are working from, your IP address can still be logged to indicate where you go and have been on the internet.

Quick Tip: Don’t Panic If Your Internet Service Is Disrupted; Be Prepared

Recently, during the evening hours, I lost my internet service connection. Our internet is provided by the local cable company and has been exceptionally dependable. Initial reboots/resets of my modem and router failed to recover the service. My gut instinct told me this was not a typical loss of service. Many folks in my neighborhood also lost their digital phone service, which caused panic to set in. I later learned the attack affected over 40 percent of their customer base (including businesses). After several days, the service was eventually restored. The culprit was a  “malicious and targeted attack from outside our network,” in a DDos attack (distributed denial of service) where the service was intentionally flooded with data sent simultaneously from many individual computers. I knew something to this effect was going on due that it got to a point I could reboot the equipment and regain service for a short period of time; then, it would drop out again.

Image result for ddos meaning

All in all, when done, and the service was restored, I learned some things:

DON’T PANIC… We live in a digital world that we are dependent on, where the source of service if attacked, can bring down the whole house, affecting many people and many types of internet-connected devices. BE PREPARED… Learn how to reboot your equipment.  Communicate with the neighbors or family to determine if they have service. A cell phone, in this case for many people, provided phone AND internet service. If you have a neighbor who has no cell phone, be the good neighbor. Follow the local news to see if it is widespread. Learn where (online) you can determine the status of the network you are connected to. In my case, I used my cell phone to get updates online from the cable company, instead of calling them on their overwhelmed customer service lines. I then passed this information on to my neighbors. When the service is restored, help each other to get the equipment back up and running. I ended up helping others reset their modems and testing to make sure they had their phone and internet service back; thus, saving them the expense of a service call (which may have taken days to get an onsite response).

In the end, I think what bothered me the most was seeing sneering comments online where people were complaining of the service going down. Having managed a computer network for a government agency, I had visions of IT people working (24/7) stressing out over this to bring back service; which, they eventually did. Also, this is concerning from the standpoint, and has to be questioned, “Is our country really prepared for these cyber attacks and is the proper funding being provided to provide the necessary defense measures?”.

Source: Antietam Broadband says all service back after widespread outage

 

 

 

Ellen DeGeneres giveaway scam spreading on social media | Malwarebytes Labs

To my reader’s at “What’s On My PC”… If you use Facebook, take a moment to read this. I have seen some of my Facebook friends being hooked into this. It is a “scam”. PLEASE, take my advice “Believe Nothing and Verify Everything”; especially, on social media.

Scammers are pushing multiple fake Facebook profiles of Ellen DeGeneres, popular US TV show host and producer, with the goal of tricking people into jumping through a few money-making hoops. This isn’t a sophisticated scam. It isn’t hacking the Gibson. It won’t be the focus of a cutting edge infosec talk. However, it’s certainly doing some damage—up to a point. This scam is a victim of its own ambition.

Ellen DeGeneres giveaway scam spreading on social media

Source: Ellen DeGeneres giveaway scam spreading on social media – Malwarebytes Labs | Malwarebytes Labs

How to Avoid Common Identity Theft Scams | Addictive Tips

This is an excellent posting at “Addictive Tips” that looks at the various common identity theft scams. I especially encourage the readers at home to take a moment and take a look at this (see source link below). There is a lot of criminality out there and the more knowledgeable you are, the safer you (and others) will be.

While there are many things that can expose your personal information (like data breaches), there are precautions you can take to prevent others that are more in your control. But how do you avoid the common identity theft scams that are out there? Today, we’ll be showing you what to look out for, and how to protect yourself.

Source: How to Avoid Common Identity Theft Scams

Fraud, Scams and Alerts – How To Protect Yourself Online and At Home with Knowledge 

The best way to protect yourself online and at home from fraud and scams is through knowledge. Posted below are links to the latest “Fraud, Scams and Alerts” at the Federal Communications Commission. Take a moment to read down this list; even if you do not open any of the links. Being knowledgeable is the best protection that you will ever have when it comes to the evil intent of others.

Fraud, Scams, and Alerts:

Source: Frauds, Scams and Alerts | Federal Communications Commission

Cybersecurity Tips For the Young and Old

It is important we hash out, over and over, the importance of how to stay safe online and what to look for. Jacqui over at “Ask A Tech Teacher” posted an article, “Teaching Basic Cybersecurity Measures To Everyday People (For Parents of Digital Natives)“, that are tips geared toward the strategy of teaching our kids the basics on how to be safe online.

After reading this article, I said, you know what(?); this article, everyone should read. We all have that kid in us and these tips are great tips that all of us big kids need to read and follow (“Harmful Links; Viruses & Malware; Suspicious Downloads; Utilizing a VPN; Best Email Practices, HTTPS > HTTP When Providing Information Online; Using Antivirus Programs; and Update Software”).

One thing I want to point out in addition to these cybersecurity protections is that three-quarters of the battle when using internet-connected devices; such as the computer, tablet or smartphone,  is learning the terminology and definitions. Get the terminology in your head and it will all start making sense and will make using these devices more of a joy, instead of a burden; PLUS, before you know it, you will want to be teaching others.

For many adults and parents, it can be a difficult task to teach the basic of staying safe online to those who are younger. However, the best strategy is starting conversations at an early age. This advice will be timeless as kids are starting to use the internet at younger and younger ages.

Source: Teaching Basic Cybersecurity Measures To Everyday People (For Parents of Digital Natives) | Ask a Tech Teacher

The rules for creating passwords are simple…

Forgot password? Five reasons why you need a password manager | ZDNet

The rules for creating passwords are simple: Use a random combination of numbers, symbols, and mixed-case letters; never reuse passwords; turn on 2FA, and use a password manager. Here’s why you can’t afford not to. Plus: Five password managers worth considering (click on the source link below to visit ZDNet for the full story).

old bunch of keys, rustiness

Source: Forgot password? Five reasons why you need a password manager | ZDNet

US gov issues emergency directive after wave of domain hijacking attacks | Naked Security

Hmmm… Is the Government Shutdown affecting National Security? This directive may indicate that (see source link below to learn more about this).

What is domain hijacking?

Domain hijacking has been a persistent issue in the commercial world for years, a prime example of which would be the attack that disrupted parts of Craigslist in November 2014. In that incident, as in every successful every domain hijacking attack, the attackers took over the account used to manage the domains at the registrar, in this case, Network Solutions. The objective is to change the records so that instead of pointing to the IP address of the correct website it sends visitors to one controlled by the attackers. This change could have been made using impersonation to persuade the registrar to change the domain settings or by stealing the admin credentials used to manage these remotely. It’s a potent attack – web users think they’re visiting the correct website because they’ve typed the correct domain in their address bar and have no reason to doubt where they end up. For attackers, it’s the perfect crime that avoids the much harder job of having to take over the real website.

Source: US gov issues emergency directive after wave of domain hijacking attacks – Naked Security

Learn How “Windows Sandbox is a safer way to run programs you don’t trust”

Sandboxing applications are nothing new but is nice to see Microsoft bake an option into the OS… As a reader of the blog noted, after I posted the article, “The feature is available for users of Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise running Build 18301 or later, and requires AMD64 and virtualization capabilities enabled in BIOS.” So, this is not an option in the home version of Windows 10. 

Microsoft is introducing a new solution that brings it in line with a standard already found on other operating systems: Windows Sandbox.

The feature creates “an isolated, temporary desktop environment” (and lightweight, at 100MB) on which to run an app, and once you’ve finished with it, the entire sandbox is deleted — everything else on your PC is safe and separate.

Read More @ Engadget

Malwarebytes for Chromebook is an Android app engineered specifically to protect your Chromebook

Own a Chromebook? Here is a version of Malwarebytes that has been engineered to work on your Chromebook. In order to get this, your Chromebook must be able to run Android apps so that you can download and install from the Google Play Store. Malwarebytes for Chromebook is an Android app engineered specifically to protect your Chromebook. Google Play automatically detect your Chromebook and will install the appropriate Malwarebytes product. I am currently running this (and testing) on my Chromebook… I am a firm supporter of Malwarebytes on all platforms (Windows, Android, etc…).

Screenshot Image

Malwarebytes for Android or Malwarebytes for Chromebook free download comes for a limited time with an extended 90-day trial of the Premium version, if you sign up for a free Malwarebytes account. No commitment to buy required. When the 90-day trial is ended, Malwarebytes will only detect and clean, but not prevent, infections. It’s ad-free, forever.

Source: Malwarebytes Security: Virus Cleaner, Anti-Malware – Apps on Google Play

From Gizmodo: These 22 Malware-Riddled Android Apps Might Be Draining Your Phone’s Battery

Malware is finding its’ way on people’s Android devices through apps that are downloaded from the Google Play Store. Google does a pretty good job of tracking these apps down, but sometimes it is to late and the app has already made its mark. Many of these apps had strong reviews. The battery draw occurs due to the app being on a constant run time of reporting back with information and possible grabs of your data.

On Thursday, anti-virus provider Sophos published a report describing its discovery of 22 Android apps that contained a variety of malware the company has named “Andr/Clickr-ad.” The apps come from a variety of small developers, and Sophos said that Google removed them from its Play store at the end of November. One of the offending apps, Sparkle Flashlight, had been downloaded more than a million times and many of them had strong reviews, according to Sophos.

Read More @ Gizmodo

Did you know that “500,000 Android users downloaded malware made by one developer”?

Malware on our Android devices is typically introduced by means such as portrayed in this article, with one goal in mind; and, that is to steal your data. Think about it, your smartphone contains a profile of YOU; where sensitive data could be used to compromise YOU on a personal and a financial basis. I tell people, treat your smartphone as if it is your wallet…

The malware was disguised as various games, and didn’t have any legitimate function; rather, they crashed every time they were launched. Now for the worst part: Stefanko said that before Google removed the apps, two of them were featured in the store’s trending section.

View image on Twitter

Source: 500,000 Android users downloaded malware made by one developer

Here are some tips on “How to Safely and Securely Dispose of Your Old Gadgets” | WIRED

This is IMPORTANT… If you are planning on getting rid of your old devices (smartphone, tablets, computers), PLEASE take at least (at minimum) the necessary steps to clear the device of your data. Always do a backup to ensure you have all of your files, before doing this.

Reflected below, are steps I extracted from the article (see source link below), that will help you wipe an Android device, a Windows Computer, and a Mac. I don’t know how many times I have assisted folks and they throw the old device in the closet somewhere and the device is still holding their entire life…

For Android devices, open up the Settings app then tap System > Advanced > Reset options, and then Erase all data (factory reset). Over on iOS, the equivalent option is in the Settings app under General > Reset > Erase All Content and Settings.

If you’re using a Windows computer, you need to load up the Settings app then click Update & Security, then Recovery, then Get started under the Reset this PC option. Choose to remove all personal files during the process. If you’re using a Chromebook or Chrome OS tablet, open up the Settings pane and pick Advanced, then Powerwash to get your computer into an as-new state.

It’s slightly more involved on a Mac: You need to restart macOS, then as soon as it begins to boot up again, hold Option+Command+R until you see a spinning globe. Release the keys, then choose Reinstall macOS, then choose Continue. Follow the on-screen instructions and select your main hard drive when prompted.

Source: How to Safely and Securely Dispose of Your Old Gadgets | WIRED

A Software Option To “Securely Wipe Your Drives, Save 20 Percent With BitRaser” | by PCMag.com

BitRaser

BitRaser is available in multiple editions that are designed for different use-cases. For typical home and professional users, the BitRaser For File package lets you securely erase an unlimited number of individual files and folders. Step up to the full BitRaser suite, and that will enable you to wipe entire drives securely with a sliding price depending on how many drives you need to wipe – perfect for IT specialists. And if you’re dealing with smartphones, BitRaser for Mobile has you covered on Android and iOS devices.

Source: Securely Wipe Your Drives, Save 20 Percent With BitRaser | PCMag.com

Scam Alert: Don’t Fall For This Facebook ‘Friend Request From You’ Message | by Putnam Daily Voice

Been receiving messages from my Facebook friends that they received another friend request from me and noticed others have been receiving this as well.  Did some research on this and found that this is all BOGUS. Just stop doing it and disregard those messages…  You can read more on this by clicking on the source link below or Google it (numerous sources out there on this matter).

You can stop forwarding that latest warning from your Facebook friends about your account being cloned. You weren’t. It’s bogus. And you’re just making it worse. It starts out:

“Hi….I actually got another friend request from you yesterday…which I ignored so you may want to check your account…” Then it tells you to “hold your finger on the message until the forward button appears…then hit forward….” Your account isn’t sending duplicate friend requests. And you didn’t receive a request from the person you’re forwarding it to.

Source: Scam Alert: Don’t Fall For This Facebook ‘Friend Request From You’ Message | Putnam Daily Voice

Here is a descriptive list of “Back to School Cyber Security Tips” – The LastPass Blog

These tips are good educational points for, not only for Students, but for everyone. I have found over the years people do not take online and device security seriously and/or do not have a good understanding of it. I encourage you to follow the source link below to learn the basics and learn how to keep your online presence safe.

Online and device security may not be the first thing that comes to mind with the new school year, but more and more middle school, high school and college students have mobile devices, laptops, and online educational requirements. It is more important than ever that students protect their digital lives as much as adults.

Source: Back to School Cyber Security Tips – The LastPass Blog

At Last, The Secret to Satellite Internet Security is Revealed

This is a Guest Post by Allen Jame, who is a follower of “What’s On My PC”. Thank you Allen for sharing your expertise on Satellite Internet Security with my readers…

Satellite communication is referred to as one of the most popular communication technology used for global communication.

Its applications are vast. Military intelligence, Broadband internet service, and weather forecasting are its some most popular applications.

The satellite dish network internet Wi-Fi is supposed to be the best solution for getting internet in the rural areas.

Although its advantages are vast still security in the satellite communication is a significant concern.

There are many limitations. For example, power control, high link delay, and link availability are some of the standard security issues on the satellite internet.

During the satellite communication, protections of the links and the satellites are not enough. Sound integrity and the confidentiality of the downlink earth stations is also a significant concern.

In this article, you will witness security issue with the satellite internet. Some of the main security issue covered in this article are:

  • Eavesdropping
  • Satellite security link protocol issues
  • Network infrastructure issues
  • TCP based security issues
  • Information-System based security issues
  • Long delays

Continue reading “At Last, The Secret to Satellite Internet Security is Revealed”

Kaspersky’s Antivirus For FREE Soon Rolling Out

I have known Kaspersky’s Antivirus to be one of the best when it comes to computer security (however, at a price — not FREE). Soon you will be able to get a baseline version of Kaspersky’s Antivirus for FREE. This new development by Kaspersky’s (according to ZDNet) is apparently in light of the U.S. Government removing Kaspersky Lab from two lists of approved vendors used by government agencies to purchase technology equipment. Apparently, this is amid concerns the Russian-based company’s products could be used by the Kremlin to gain entry into United States networks.

The removal of Kapersky’s from the vendors list follows the accusations from US intelligence agencies that Russia hacked into Democratic Party emails, thus helping Donald Trump to election victory, despite President Vladimir Putin proclaiming his country has never engaged in hacking activities, but some “patriotic” individuals may have.

Ok, now that you have digested this, is it safe to install the free version of Kaspersky’s on our home-based computer systems? Personally, I am not installing it and will stick to the free version of BitDefender; however, if you are interested in the FREE version, click on the source link below to monitor for its’ release. Reportedly, the free version will rollout to the U.S. first…

If you do opt to give this a try, make sure you remove (uninstall) any antivirus software that is currently existing on your computer. Typically, to remove antivirus software, it is best practices to visit the website of the product and look for an uninstaller that will completely and safely remove the antivirus software from your PC.

SOURCE: Kaspersky’s Antivirus FREE

 

Malwarebytes Labs Explain The “Dark Web” AKA: “Deep Web”

I encourage you visit the source link below to learn about the “Dark Web” (aka: Deep Web). Did you know that only 5% of the Web is easily accessible to the general public and that many other sites can only be visited if you have a direct URL. I often referred to the “Dark Web” here on the blog as the underbelly of the internet…

Before you go to read the article (which is very interesting), you need to learn some terminology:

  • Surface Web is what we would call the regular World Wide Web that is indexed and where websites are easy to find.
  • The Deep Web is the unindexed part of the Web. Actually, anything that a search engine can’t find.
  • The Dark Web is intentionally hidden, anonymous, and widely known for illicit activities.

Explained: the Dark Web

SOURCE: Malwarebytes Labs – Explained: the Dark Web

Many of the warning phrases you probably heard from your parents and teachers are also applicable to using computers and the Internet….

I am reblogging this information from US-CERT Security Tip (ST05-014) – Real-World Warnings Keep You Safe Online

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Seal. United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team US-CERT

Why are these warnings important?

Like the real world, technology and the Internet present dangers as well as benefits. Equipment fails, attackers may target you, and mistakes and poor judgment happen. Just as you take precautions to protect yourself in the real world, you need to take precautions to protect yourself online. For many users, computers and the Internet are unfamiliar and intimidating, so it is appropriate to approach them the same way we urge children to approach the real world.

What are some warnings to remember?

  • Don’t trust candy from strangers – Finding something on the Internet does not guarantee that it is true. Anyone can publish information online, so before accepting a statement as fact or taking action, verify that the source is reliable. It is also easy for attackers to “spoof” email addresses, so verify that an email is legitimate before opening an unexpected email attachment or responding to a request for personal information. (See Using Caution with Email Attachmentsand Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks for more information.)
  • If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is – You have probably seen many emails promising fantastic rewards or monetary gifts. However, regardless of what the email claims, there are not any wealthy strangers desperate to send you money. Beware of grand promises—they are most likely spam, hoaxes, or phishing schemes. (See Reducing Spam and Identifying Hoaxes and Urban Legends.) Also be wary of pop-up windows and advertisements for free downloadable software—they may be disguising spyware. (See Recognizing and Avoiding Spyware.)
  • Don’t advertise that you are away from home – Some email accounts, especially within an organization, offer a feature (called an autoresponder) that allows you to create an “away” message if you are going to be away from your email for an extended period of time. The message is automatically sent to anyone who emails you while the autoresponder is enabled. While this is a helpful feature for letting your contacts know that you will not be able to respond right away, be careful how you phrase your message. You do not want to let potential attackers know that you are not home, or, worse, give specific details about your location and itinerary. Safer options include phrases such as “I will not have access to email between [date] and [date].” If possible, also restrict the recipients of the message to people within your organization or in your address book. If your away message replies to spam, it only confirms that your email account is active. This practice may increase the amount of spam you receive.
  • Lock up your valuables – If an attacker is able to access your personal data, he or she may be able to compromise or steal the information. Take steps to protect this information by following good security practices. (See the Tips index page for a list of relevant documents.) Some of the most basic precautions include locking your computer when you step away; using firewalls, anti-virus software, and strong passwords; installing appropriate software updates; and taking precautions when browsing or using email.
  • Have a backup plan – Since your information could be lost or compromised (due to an equipment malfunction, an error, or an attack), make regular backups of your information so that you still have clean, complete copies. (See Good Security Habits.) Backups also help you identify what has been changed or lost. If your computer has been infected, it is important to remove the infection before resuming your work. (See Recovering from Viruses, Worms, and Trojan Horses.) Keep in mind that if you did not realize that your computer was infected, your backups may also be compromised.

Geek Squeak #17-020: An Advanced Users’ Malware Killer

Curious if any of the folks out there with technical expertise have ever used RogueKiller? I typically go to Malwarebytes AntiMalware; however, I see RogueKiller has pretty darn good reviews.  The main point that jumps out at me is that RogueKiller is for advanced users (see video below)…

Roguekiller is a popular and an effective tool to remove some stubborn malware but be warned; you better know what you’re doing. While a lot of more well-known tools will only scan and delete for you, this tool will show you everything it finds that is a possible problem. You need to know what to remove and what not to remove, or you could delete something you want, or need. Your results may vary, but just use caution and do your homework before removing anything or ask someone who is computer savvy.

SOURCE: Major Geeks -RogueKiller 12.11.1.0


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These 7 Tips (from Kim Komando) Will Help You Master Facebook

I love Kim Komando’s tech column at USAToday and find her posted information very useful and on the same parallel to my blog when it comes to assisting home-based computer users.

Kim recently posted an article, “These 7 tips will help you master Facebook” that you should read, if you are an advocate of Facebook. In all honesty, I do not care for Facebook; however, I do care about the safety and security of people (which has been my lifelong profession as a law enforcement (and security) officer and computer info specialist).

The one tip that Kim posted in this article that jumps out at me, in regards to your safety and security, is the tip “Find out where you are logged in”… Many Facebook users (carelessly) log into multiple devices, often at multiple locations, and keep their Facebook pages open in order to “conveniently” access their account without having to log in. The upside to this is user convenience; however, the downside to this is you are setting yourself up to have your account compromised, which could result in devastating consequences.

To see if your account is open on other devices and locations, here is how (as Kim Komando pointed out) to determine that:

Just to go to Settings >> Security Settings >> Where You’re Logged In, and you’ll find a list of devices that are currently accessing your Facebook account. The feature also lists login metadata, such as when and where you last checked in, plus the type of device you used. Keep in mind that cell phones sometimes show weird locations, which may refer to a cell phone tower and not necessarily to where you were standing at the time.

Facebook

That said, if your login information looks a little fishy, it’s possible your account has been compromised. It’s best to lock down access before this even happens.

Kim Komando is a consumer tech columnist for USA TODAY. She also hosts the nation’s largest radio show about the digital lifestyle, heard on 435 stations in the USA and globally on American Forces Radio. Find your local radio station, get the podcast and more at Komando.com.

SOURCE: USAToday – Kim Komando


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Microsoft Patches MS-Word Exploit That Spreads Malware

On the same day Microsoft officially began rolling out the Creators Update for Windows 10, they were also rolling out a patch for a zero-day exploit (that spreads malware) for all current Microsoft Office versions used on every Windows operating system (including the latest Office 2016 running on Windows 10). If you are running Microsoft Office at home, make sure you have installed the patch. To learn more, click on the source link below…

All versions of Office on all versions of Windows are vulnerable to this zero-day that spreads malware, so make sure you patch quickly

Source: Microsoft patches Word zero-day booby-trap exploit – Naked Security

Was Informed That A New Version Of Malwarebytes Has Been Released

In discussion with a computer geek friend of mine he indicated that Malwarebytes has a new version out (v3.0). I further confirmed this and learned that a new version was released on and about March 20, 2017. Based on what I am reading on their blog (for this release) — CLICK HERE — the excitement over this release is that it is being touted as a next generation anti-virus replacement and will be called only Malwarebytes.

Once you download and install you will be entitled to a 14 day free trial. If you desire to revert to the FREE edition now and turn “off” the free trial, simply click on the “settings” (at the left side) and then click on “my accounts”, then turn off the trial under “subscription details”. If you decide to stick with the free edition, you will need to periodically perform the scans manually.

Malwarebytes is one of the first things I install on a new computer and is my “go to” tool when helping others eradicate malware and other exploits…

This product is built to provide comprehensive protection against today’s threat landscape so that you can finally replace your traditional antivirus.

Our engineers have spent the last year building this product from the ground up and have combined our Anti-Malware, Anti-Exploit, Anti-Ransomware, Website Protection, and Remediation technologies all into a single product which we simply call “Malwarebytes.” And it scans your computer 4 times faster!

mb3

With the combination of our Anti-Malware ($24.95), Anti-Exploit ($24.95) and Anti-Ransomware (free, beta) technologies, we will be selling Malwarebytes 3.0 at $39.99 per computer per year, 20% less than our previous products combined and 33% less than an average traditional antivirus. But don’t worry, if you are an existing customer with an active subscription or a lifetime license to Malwarebytes Anti-Malware, you will keep your existing price and get a free upgrade to Malwarebytes 3.0. If you have both an Anti-Malware and an Anti-Exploit subscription, we will upgrade you to a single subscription to Malwarebytes 3.0, reduce your subscription price and add more licenses to your subscription.

Source: Malwarebytes

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