The “Dark Theme” Option Is Coming To Gmail (for Android and iOS) – Here is how to activate it…

Per a GSuite blog update, it may take a while (up to 15 days) before you see it on your device(s).

Below is how to enable dark mode in Android and iOS.

How to enable dark theme in Gmail on Android: 

  • To enable dark theme on Android 10:
    • In your Android Display system setting, set your device to Dark theme—Gmail will automatically respect the system default setting.
    • On Pixel, when Battery Saver is enabled, Gmail will default to Dark theme automatically.
    • Or, in Gmail go to Settings > Theme and select “Dark”.

How to enable Dark theme in Gmail on iOS: 

  • For iOS 11 or 12, enable Dark theme by going to Settings > Dark Theme.
  • To enable dark theme on iOS 13, you can:
    • Set your device to dark theme in iOS Settings, and Gmail, by default, will automatically respect the system default setting.
    • Or, in Gmail go to Settings > Theme and select “Dark”.

Source: G Suite Updates Blog: Dark theme is coming to Gmail for Android and iOS


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Quick Tip: Four “Must Learn” Gmail Search Operators

I have been using Gmail since its’ inception and as a result, I literally have thousands of email that have accumulated in the account. Searching for a specific email in a sea of thousands of emails can be a daunting task. Many times I can simply enter the person’s name into the search box to find the email I am looking for; however, there are times where I need to use special search operators to quickly narrow down the result. This is where I have taught myself to use these four search operators to narrow down exactly what email I am looking for.

Specify the sender… 

from:
Example: from:amy

Specify a recipient…

to:
Example: to:david

Specify a recipient who received a copy…

cc:
bcc:
Example: cc:david

Words in the subject line…

subject:
Example: subject:dinner


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Quick Tip: How To Turn A Gmail Account Into A Powerful Note-Taking And Note-Keeping App

Evernote, OneNote, and SimpleNote are the note-taking apps that we all hear about. I have accounts with all three and have used them extensively; however, I just cannot get settled with any of them. I initially started out with a free Evernote account; then, Evernote ended up limiting what you could and could not do. OneNote, great note-taking app; however, I was never completely satisfied with the app, due to its’ slowness (in loading and performing searches). Simplenote, which is text-based only (with some markup language) is ok if all you want to do is save text-based notes.

After using all three of these, I kept thinking, there has to be a better way. This is when I came up with the idea of creating and using a separate Gmail account from my personal Gmail account to specifically store notes, documents, etc. Continue reading “Quick Tip: How To Turn A Gmail Account Into A Powerful Note-Taking And Note-Keeping App”

A New Gmail Feature Will Soon Be Checking Your Grammar

According to an article posted by Taylor Kerns, at Android Police, “Gmail will soon let you know just how bad your grammar sucks” with a new built-in grammar checker (and enhanced spellcheck that will auto-correct spelling errors). The rollout of these features are scheduled in September for G Suite users; with no rollout date set at this time for regular Gmail account users at home (like you and me). For us at home, be patient, it will come; and, when it does this will be a welcome addition.

Source: Android Police – Gmail will soon let you know just how bad your grammar sucks


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Quick Tip: How To Send (and Request) Money Using Gmail

Who would have ever thought you would be able to send (and receive) money using email. With Google’s Gmail, you can. When composing an email in Gmail, at the bottom, you will see a “$” sign. If you click on that “$’ sign you will be walked through the process of sending money where a Google Pay, Debit or Bank Account is required. You can send the money to any email recipient, does not have to be another Gmail account, and it is free so long as you have one of the three bank accounts as mentioned. The first time a recipient receives money through Gmail, they will need to add a debit card to transfer the money to. After that first time, whenever someone sends money through Gmail, it will automatically and seamlessly transfer to that card.  You can also “request” money using the Gmail ‘$” feature, as well.


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Quick Tip: How To Add An Email Signature To Your Gmail

Create a Gmail signature

An email signature is text, like your contact information or a favorite quote, that’s automatically added at the end of Gmail messages as a footer. This text can be formatted and graphics can be added to really make the signature stand out.

Add or change a signature

You can put up to 10,000 characters in your signature.

  1. Open Gmail.
  2. In the top right, click Settings Settings and then Settings.
  3. In the “Signature” section, add your signature text in the box. If you want, you can format your message by adding an image or changing the text style.
  4. At the bottom of the page, click Save Changes

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Quick Tip: The Power Of The “Right Mouse Click” Context Menu In Gmail

Gmail has become a very powerful web email application that has many features that we often fail to use. One such feature is the “right mouse click” context menu.

When Gmail is open, if you “right mouse click” on any email that is listed you will be presented with a context menu that is very powerful and will be of great benefit to you productivity-wise.

You can do such things, on the fly, such as:

  • Reply to, or forward, an email in one click from the main page
  • Archive, Delete, Mark as unread, Snooze emails
  • Move, Label or Mute emails
  • Search for all emails with the same subject (if conversation view is turned off)

You can also use this menu when selecting multiple emails at a time to perform batch operations. For example, you could select 5 emails, right mouse click and label them all the same; or move them all together into a specific folder…

Quick Tip: How to block a Nuisance Gmail Sender

Getting a rampant amount of email from a specific sender in Gmail?  If so, simply block them. When you block the nuisance sender, their emails sent to you will land in your spam folder.

Follow the instructions below to block a sender in Gmail. You can use the same steps to unblock them, as well.

When you block a sender, messages they send will go to your Spam folder.

  1. On your computer, go to Gmail.
  2. Open the message.
  3. In the top right, click More More.
  4. Click Block [sender].

Quick Tip: How To Quickly Switch Between Multiple Gmail Accounts

Today, many of us have multiple Gmail Accounts (i.e. personal account, work account, account for shopping purposes, etc…).  Here is a line of instruction that will help you toggle between these accounts while in your default (main) account without having to go through the task of signing in and out of each account.

  • Open your browser and sign into your Gmail account.
  • Click on your profile picture, located in the upper right-hand side of your Gmail dashboard screen. If you do not have a profile picture setup, what you will be looking for is the circular icon at the top right side of the Gmail window. When you click on this a new window will pop up.
  • Click on the “add account” button within that new window.
  • Enter your second Gmail address in the box and type in that account’s password.
  • Click on “sign in.”
  • Repeat as many times as necessary.

multiple gmail accounts in web

Once all of your Gmail accounts are linked, you can switch between your accounts by clicking on your profile picture and selecting the account you wish to access from the drop-down menu that appears.

 

Quick Tip: How To Save A Gmail Message To Your Computer

The best way I have found to save a Gmail message to you computer (in its’ original format) is to do this:

In Gmail, open the message you desire to save to your computer.

At the top of the message (right side) you will see a printer icon. Click on that icon.

When the “Print” window pops up, click on the drop-down box next to “Destination” and select “Save to PDF”, then click on “Save”, and you will be prompted to save the result to your computer. The saved file will be in the “PDF” file format.

Note: There is also another option on the drop-down menu where you can also “Save to Google Drive” that is handy when you do not want to save the file to the computer that you are working on.

The NEW “Schedule” Email Option Now Rolling Out To Gmail

Gmail users, the NEW “schedule” email option is now rolling out. Go into your Gmail, click on compose, enter a recipient’s email address and if you go to the bottom left corner where it displays the send button (see below) you will see a small down arrow. Click on the down arrow and then click on “Schedule Send”.  From that point forward it is self-explanatory. You can then select a date and time that you wish for the email to be sent.

Gmail send later

gmail-schedule-send.png

I am thinking of scheduling and sending an email for far out in the future, beyond my demise, to let everyone know, I am spiritually still with them and that there is Gmail in Heaven.

Photos: 15 years of Gmail | TechRepublic

Wow…  How Gmail (and Us) have evolved. I worked in IT at a time when the internet was ramping up and online services were in their infancy. My very first email account was a Hotmail account, that I still have to this day, and AOL was a favorite of many people. What was your first email account?

With its launch on April 1, 2004, many people thought Gmail was an elaborate April Fool’s prank. It was anything but that, and the past 15 years have proven how serious Google is about email.

Source: Photos: 15 years of Gmail – TechRepublic

Write Now, Send Later – Not Seeing This on Gmail (at home) Yet…

I am hoping this feature hits our Gmail Accounts that we privately use at home. The feature will allow you to compose an email and schedule it to send later.

SCHEDULE_SEND_DESKTOP.gif

Write now, send later

We understand that work can often carry over to non-business hours, but it’s important to be considerate of everyone’s downtime. We want to make it easier to respect everyone’s digital well-being, so we’re adding a new feature to Gmail that allows you to choose when an email should be sent. Just write your email as you normally would, then schedule it to arrive in your recipient’s inbox at a later date and time.

Source: 15 years and counting—making Gmail work faster and smarter for businesses | Google Cloud Blog

Google is adding more options to the right-click context menu in Gmail.

 With these new options, you can take even more actions, directly from a message, in your inbox such as:

  • Reply to, or forward, an email in one click from the main page
  • Search for all emails from a sender
  • Search for all emails with the same subject (if conversation view is turned off)
  • Open multiple emails in multiple new windows at the same time
  • Easily add a label or move an email

Source: G Suite Updates Blog: Easily take action in Gmail with new right-click context menu options

Did you know you can now “Send Secure, Self-Destructing Emails in Gmail using Confidential Mode?”

I did not know this feature was even there until I read the article at one of my favorite sites (I Love Free Software). Yes, you can now send secure, self-destructing emails in Gmail using what is called confidential mode. I encourage you to learn how to use this feature by following the tutorial that is provided by clicking on the source link below.

secure and self destructing email created using gmail confidential mode

This tutorial explains how to send secure and self destructing emails in Gmail using confidential mode. This is a new feature of Gmail which has come with its new interface. While composing an email in Gmail, you can turn on confidential mode in a single click. After that, you can set expiration time of the email using the preset options (expire in 1 day, 3 months, 1 week, 1 month, or 5 years). Apart from that, it also provides passcode feature to securely send that particular self destructing email.

Source: How to Send Secure, Self Destructing Emails in Gmail using Confidential Mode

Here Is How To Snooze Emails In Gmail | Addictive Tips

Open Gmail and hover your mouse over an email that you want to snooze. You will see a little clock icon. Click it and you will see a few preset options for how long the email should be snoozed. You can set a custom option by clicking Pick Date and Time. You will get a calendar and a time field where you can select how long i.e. what day and at what time you want to be reminded of the message.

Source: How To Snooze Emails In Gmail

NEW Gmail – Here’s what makes it so special (and a little frustrating) And How to Activate It

If you haven’t already done so, you need to upgrade and try the NEW Gmail interface on the web. So far, I am loving it. Here is a good article (see source link below) by Inc. that will give you the skinny on what to expect; and, that getting to the new interface is only a couple mouse clicks away.

To get the new Gmail look (and features), open your Gmail, click on the settings cog (top right) and select the option “Try the new Gmail”… In the event you do not like what you are seeing, you can always go back to the classic Gmail by following the same steps.

Source: Inc. – This New Gmail Update is Insane (Most People Don’t Realize It’s Just a Click Away)

 

Quick Rundown Of The New Gmail

Here is a quick rundown of the new Gmail, straight from the horse’s mouth… To get the new Gmail look (and features), open your Gmail, click on the settings cog (top right) and select the option “Try the new Gmail”… In the event you do not like what you are seeing, you can always go back to the classic Gmail by following the same steps.

Best new feature, I like, is the panel on the right side of the Gmail window that allows you quick access to your Tasks, Google Calendar and Google Keep…

Click the source link below to learn more…

Gmail Convergence_Consumer_Image 1

Source: Stay composed: here’s a quick rundown of the new Gmail

Gmail Revamp Being Launched Today

As reported by TechCrunch: “Today, Google  is launching the biggest revamp of Gmail in years. The company is bringing to the flagship Gmail service many (but not all) of the features it trialed in Inbox for Gmail, and adding a few new ones, too. With those new features, which we first reported earlier this month, the company is also introducing a refreshed design for the service, though if you’ve used Gmail before, you’ll feel right at home”.

gmail-grid

Source: Say hello to the new Gmail with self-destructing messages, email snoozing and more | TechCrunch

New Design Coming To Gmail

Been reading this everywhere in the tech news about the new design coming to Gmail, with some cool and really sensible features. Follow the source link below to learn more about this (with screenshots) at Ars Technica.

Red alert, people! Gmail is being redesigned. Google sent out an email to G Suite administrators warning them a “fresh, clean look” would be coming to Gmail.com soon. Shortly after the email went out, leaked pictures of the design were posted to Android Authority and The Verge, so we have a ton of pictures to obsess over….

Source: Gmail.com redesign leaks, looks pretty incredible | Ars Technica

Gmail Can Now Convert Text To Interactive Links (whenever phone numbers, addresses or emails are detected)

Gmail on the web, Android and iOS can now convert text to interactive links whenever a phone number, address or email is detected. If a phone number is detected in Gmail, you can now click on the phone number and the default phone app will launch to initiate the call. If a postal mailing address is detected in Gmail, you can now click on the address and Google Maps will be launched. If an email address is detected in Gmail, you can now click on the email address and the default email app will launch. The objective of this new feature is to save you time from having to copy/paste this information from one application to another.


SOURCE: G Suites Updates Blog

How to remove the “FWD” in forwarded Gmails…

As I continue to work on my project of How To Use A Gmail Account To Create Your Own Customized Note-Taking App, I am sure learning a lot about Gmail. For example, I wanted to know if you can remove the “FWD” in the subject line in a forwarded Gmail? I could see where this could be useful; especially, when you don’t want the recipient (such as a customer) to know that it was an email you received from someone else and then forwarded it to them. In my case, where I am using one of my Gmail accounts exclusively as a note-taking app, by removing the “FWD” would help me clean up any notes I had edited (forwarded) and ultimately would give the appearance of a true note-taking app (such as Evernote, OneNote, and Simple Note).

After some exploring, I found that you can easily remove the “FWD”. You just have to look for it. When you forward a Gmail you will notice a small box (see screenshot) with an arrow pointing to the right (which indicates it is a forwarded Gmail) and beside that arrow, you will see a small arrow pointing downward. Click on that arrow and a drop-down menu will appear. On that menu, click on “Edit Subject”. After you click on “Edit Subject” you will be permitted to edit the subject of the email; for which you can remove the “FWD” and actually change the subject line to anything you want. Also, after you have completed editing the subject line, go into the body of the email and remove any other extraneous text that you typically would see in a forwarded email. Once you get this cleaned up, the recipient will never know the email was forwarded.

SOURCE: What’s On My PC – How To Remove The “FWD” In Forwarded Gmails

Using The Fireshot Browser Extension To Email Web Content To My Gmail Note Taking Account

This is sort of a repost of two things that go hand-in-hand… I recently posted the article, “How To Use A Gmail Account To Create Your Own Customized Note-Taking App“; AND ALSO, back in December posted the article, “FireShot – Google Chrome Extension to Take Screenshots“.

My project of customizing and using a Gmail account solely as a note taking app is working better than I ever anticipated and better than the other note-taking apps I was using (such as Evernote, OneNote, and Simplenote). I don’t see me going back to anything else. Just too many benefits with using the Gmail platform…

One benefit that I am taking advantage of is the FREE version of the Fireshot browser extension which allows you to capture an entire web page, the visible part of a page or a specific part of a page (that you can select). Where the benefit to me with this is that Fireshot has an option where you can use Gmail to send whatever it is that you clipped (in the PDF, PNG or JPEG formats). I prefer the PDF format due that after the conversion is made, the links in the captured page are active. Many of the other note taking apps have browser extensions that allow you to clip web site text, pictures, pages, etc… I can now do the same (and better) by using Fireshot to email web content to my Gmail Note Taking account. Fireshot is available as an extension for Firefox, Chrome, Opera or IE.

SOURCES: Fireshot and How To Use A Gmail Account To Create Your Own Customized Note-Taking App

How To Create and Set A Web Link To Go To A Specific Gmail Account

I currently have 4 different Gmail accounts that I access for 4 different purposes… One of these accounts, I wanted to directly access via a web link, is an account that I am using for note taking purposes (see the article on this). After doing some research you can link multiple Gmail accounts together through your main account, for which I already do; however, I wanted to create a web link that would take me directly to my note taking account, so that I could add that link to my Start.me home page.  Start.me is an awesome way to organize, access and quickly launch your favorite bookmarks on your own customized home page. I have been using Start.me for several years.

After doing some research, to set a specific Gmail account to open via a web link, you should use the following link:

https://accounts.google.com/AccountChooser?continue=https%3A%2F%2Fmail.google.com%2Fmail%2Fu%2F%3Fauthuser%3DUSERNAME%40DOMAIN&service=mail&Email=USERNAME@DOMAIN

replacing USERNAME@DOMAIN.COM with the email account address.

This currently is working well, unless Google changes something.  In the event you are not logged into the account, you will be prompted to login as normal.

Using A Gmail Account To Create Your Own Customized Note-Taking App

Evernote, OneNote, and SimpleNote are the note-taking apps that we all hear about. I have accounts with all three and have used them extensively; however, I just cannot get settled with any of them. I initially started out with a free Evernote account; then, Evernote ended up limiting what a free user could do. OneNote, great note-taking app; however, I was never completely satisfied with the app, due to its’ slowness (in loading and performing searches). Simplenote, which is text-based only (with some markup language) is ok if all you want to do is save text-based notes.

After using all three of these, I kept thinking, there has to be a better way. This is when I came up with the idea of creating and using a Gmail account specifically for note-taking (or note-keeping). Think about it. anything you find on the internet can be sent directly to a Gmail account; plus, on my Android phone, I can share (or send) just about anything to a Gmail account (i.e. scanned documents, photos, etc…). Gmail also has the labeling feature built-in where hierarchical note categories can be created (or labeled); plus, it has the ability to create rich text-based notes (using the email editor). The real clincher with this is Gmail’s (Google’s) powerful search capabilities, 15GB of storage, and the ability to attach documents using Google Docs. I have been working with this idea and the key point in making it work is that the account should be strictly used for note-taking (or note-keeping) purposes only; and, not for daily email purposes. In other words, my Gmail note-taking account is a completely separate account from my main Gmail account.

Below are the steps I took to create (in appearance) my own personal note-taking (or note-keeping) app using a Gmail account as the container to store stuff (notes, pics, docs, etc…) that are important to me. 

Step 1: Create a new account at Gmail.com. Give the account a name that you will recognize for note-taking purposes.

For example, “johndoe.notebook@gmail.com” …

Step 2: Once the account has been created, one of the first things I did was change the theme so that it stood out. Go to the “cogged gear” icon, at the top right side of the Gmail window and click on “Themes”. The theme I selected was one called “High Contrast”, which gives it the look of a note-taking (or note-keeping) app — (see screenshot below).

Step 3: Go to the “cogged gear” icon and click on settings.

Step 4: Under the “General” tab, scroll down and turn the “Conversation View” to “off” and if you like, scroll down to “My Picture” and add a profile picture. In my case, I used a notebook icon. When done, scroll to the bottom and click on “save settings.

Step 5: Go back into the “Settings” and under the “Labels” tab, hide all labels with the exception of the “inbox” and “drafts” labels. Scroll down to the “Create Labels” section. This is where you can create your own label categories. You can always add or remove labels, in the future, from this section.

Step 6: Under the “Inbox” tab go to the categories section and “uncheck” the categories that are shown; then, scroll to the bottom and and click on “save settings”.

Step 7: Go back into the “Settings” and under the “Labs” tab scroll until you see “Preview Pane”. Once found, click on “Enable” to activate the “Preview Pane”; then, scroll down and click on “Save Settings” which will return you to the main Gmail screen.

Step 8: We’re almost done… Now that you have activated the “Preview Pane”, you will see a toggle icon (for the Preview Pane) with a down arrow. Click on the down arrow and select “vertical Split”.

After completing the aforementioned step, your Gmail note-taking app should look something like this:

Click Here For Larger View

When composing a new note, within your Gmail note-taking account, click on “Compose” to draft your note. When finished drafting your note send the note back to yourself. Once it lands in the inbox, assign a label to it. I also use my main everyday Gmail account and my Android Smartphone to send important stuff to my Gmail note-taking account. Another point to make is that I eventually tag and move items out of the inbox and use the inbox to show items I am currently working on.

To draft an existing note, I search for the note, click on “Forward”, make my changes, then forward it back to my Gmail note-taking account; then, I delete the original. When I see that a note has FWD that tells me at one point it has been changed.

In the end, as I continue to work with this, I am finding that the concept of customizing and using a Gmail account as a note-taking app has far exceeded my expectations… What I have reflected is “my way” of doing this and have changed “my way” of doing this several times since the original posting of this article. You can make this as easy or complex as you want and that is one of the reasons I like using a separate email account for my important notes.

Geek Squeak #17-021: Save Your Butt With Gmail’s “Undo Send”

A feature that I activated in Gmail, many moons ago (back in 2015), is the “Undo Send” feature. You can activate “Undo Send” in your Gmail settings by clicking on the “gear icon” (top right side), then click “Settings”; then, scroll down until you see “Undo Send”.  Click in the box, next to “Enable Undo Send” and then select the delay time before the email is sent.  In my case I selected the maximum setting of 30 seconds. MAKE SURE you then scroll to the bottom of settings screen and click on “Save Settings”.

Now that you have activated this feature, when you go to send an email, at the top of the screen you will see what is displayed in the screenshot below, with the option to “undo”. If you click on “undo”, the email will not be sent.

I highly recommend that you activate this feature. I don’t know how many times, using that feature, that I have canceled sending an email, to make a correction and/or had second thoughts about sending the email.


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Learn How To Find and Use The Windows Snipping Tool

A forgotten feature (or app) in Windows 7, 8.1 and 10 is the Windows screen capture utility, called the “Snipping Tool”. Personally, I use a third party screen capture utility called FSCapture; but, there are more times than I can remember where I was away from my computer (such as at work) and needed to quickly capture something on the screen and did not have FSCapture available.

If you are not familiar with the “Snipping Tool”; it is a built-in Windows Accessory (software app), once launched, that gives you the ability to take a snapshot of anything you see on your screen, whether it be full screen or just a specific region of the screen. After you take the screenshot, you can then save it to various graphic file formats (such as PNG, JPG GIF), that can be inserted in a document, sent via email, archived, etc… As a blogger, I would be lost without a screen capture utility and my productivity (and presentation) would diminish.

Typically, on Windows 10, the tool can be found under the Windows Accessories folder on the Start Menu; however, here is several ways to get to it, using the search box, on Windows 10, 8.1 and 7: 

For Windows 10 – Select the Start  button, type snipping tool in the search box on the taskbar, and then select Snipping Tool from the list of results.

For Windows 8.1 / Windows RT 8.1 – Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Search (or if you’re using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer up, and then click Search), type snipping tool in the search box, and then select Snipping Tool from the list of results.

For Windows 7 – Select the Start  button, then type snipping tool in the search box, and then select Snipping Tool from the list of results.

In Snipping Tool, select Mode (in older versions, select the arrow next to the New button), choose the kind of snip you want, and then select the area of your screen that you want to capture. After you are satisfied with the result, simply save it to the file format you desire.

Snipping Tool mode options


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Did You Know You Can Send and Receive Money With Gmail?

I’ve been seeing article’s today to indicate that you can now send and receive money with Gmail for Android AND that this feature has been available on the web version of Gmail for some time.

I did not know, until today, that there was an option in Gmail to transfer money. From what I understand, a Google Wallet account is required.

On the web version, to send money to another recipient, see the following steps. For other options, such as receiving money, click on the source link below for further instructions.

Send money with Gmail

  1. Open Gmail.
  2. Click the Compose button.
  3. Enter the email address of the person you want to send money to.
  4. Add a subject and message text (optional).
  5. Click the $ icon (£ for UK users).
  6. Enter the amount you want to send and choose a payment method or add a new one.
  7. Click Review.
  8. Click Attach.
  9. Look over your message one more time and click Send.

To learn more about sending & receiving money using Gmail, click on the source link below…

Source: Send & receive money with Gmail – Computer – Gmail Help

To learn more about sending money using the Android version of Gmail — CLICK HERE  …

A FREE Software Solution To Backup Your Gmail

Many of us at home rely on Google’s Gmail, as our email service provider. Gmail, for me, has been a very reliable service; however, I do often think, what would happen if my account was hacked and I lost years and years of accumulated emails???

To give some level of comfort there is a software solution called “Upsafe Gmail Backup” that gives you the ability to backup your email and even the option to restore email(s) that you may have deleted.  All backups are stored local to a folder on your computer. The first time you run the software, the backup may take awhile depending on the amount of emails you have stored in your Gmail account. Subsequent backups are incremental and are much faster.

To get a feel how “Upsafe Gmail Backup” works, check out the video below. If further interested in taking a look at this and trying, click on the source link below.

Backup your mailbox with our free Upsafe solution. Restore your Gmail emails even when you deleted them from your trash box. Download it for free now!

Source: Upsafe Free Gmail backup

Log Into Another Google Account Using Incognito Mode

When I use my personal Gmail account, from Google Chrome, I typically log into two other Gmail sub-accounts that I can easily access or toggle to, from my main account.  The problem I run into with this is that one of the sub-accounts I use I often need to get to Google Drive and a Google Website (Blogger) that is associated with that account.  Google will not allow me to “EASILY” access those services from a sub-account when logged into my main account. As a result, I would typically have to log out of my main account and then log back into Gmail for the sub-account.

Incognito Mode

A workaround for this that I now use, is to go to the Google Chrome Menu (top right corner) and click on “New Incognito Window”. From the incognito window I simply log into the account I need to access (to get to Google Drive and the Blogger site) to perform the tasks that I need to perform. Since I am in an incognito window, I don’t have to log out of my main account and lose the login credentials for the other two sub accounts.

If you are wondering what the “Incognito Mode” is in Google Chrome???

“Incognito mode opens a new window where you can browse the Internet in private without Chrome saving the sites you visit. You can switch between an Incognito window and any regular Chrome browsing windows you have open. You’ll only be in Incognito mode when you’re using the Incognito window”.

This Gmail Phishing Attack Is Even Fooling The Tech-Savvy 

This Gmail Phishing attack (see source link below) has been making tech news and is very important that you are made aware. It has been known by Google since March of 2016. This deceptive sneaky attack is currently only targeting Gmail accounts. The cybercriminals trick you into giving away your Google or Gmail Login Credentials. It is even fooling those who are tech-savvy and very familiar with phishing schemes.

Once an account has been compromised, the attackers immediately access it and start targeting the victim’s contacts.

 

Gmail phishing attack: cybercriminals use cleverly designed URLs and they immediately access the hacked accounts

Source: Phished Gmail Accounts Immediately Accessed by Hackers | SecurityWeek.Com

Handy Graphic That Illustrates All The Known Gmail Search Operators

Gmail is no exception when it comes to the plethora of search operators that it supports to assist you with finding that elusive email that literally can be buried in thousands and thousands of emails. Below you will find a handy graphic that I want to share with you that illustrates all the known search operators. I received this graphic in my government work email account and thought I would share it with you here on the blog.

A search operator (sometimes referred to as a search parameter) is a character or string of characters used in a search engine query to narrow the focus of the search. [source: Whatis.com].

To apply one of the search operators, you simply enter the search operator parameter (or command) in the Gmail search box for whatever it is you need to track or narrow down. For example, let’s say I wanted to find all unread emails in my account. I would simply enter in the search box, is:unread from the list below and like magic, all unread emails will instantly appear.

 

 

How To Archive Thousands Of Emails In Your Gmail Inbox

I’ve been on quite a few computers here recently and have noticed that many people are Gmail users. One thing I noticed is that they do not keep a cleaned out inbox. I have pointed out it is a good thing to archive the emails and get them out of the inbox. By archiving the emails you are simply sending to them to the “All Mail” folder or tag; therefore, they are not deleted. By archiving your mail you will immediately discover that WOW factor where you will start to feel organized…  

The problem is if you have thousands of emails to archive. Gmail will only allow you to select a certain number to archive at a time (which is usually 50 or 100). You can go this route, but it literally could take you hours to clean out your inbox and archive your mail.

The workaround solution to this problem is thisCourtesy of Peter Bonez — Data Science in the Nation’s Capital

  1. Enter in:inbox into the search bar
  2. Press the search button or press return to run the search
  3. Click on the small down arrow on the search bar and select Create filter with this search
  4. Click OK when warned that the filter will not apply to new mail
  5. Select Skip the Inbox (Archive It) and Also apply filter to X matching conversations.
  6. Click Create Filter

IMPORTANT: Gmail will think for a moment, then poof! your inbox will be empty, with all your mail tucked away safely in your archive. It’s a good idea to delete the filter you just created to avoid unwanted behavior. Just navigate Settings –> Filter and delete the in:Inbox filter.

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