Gmail will now let you attach emails to your emails | The Verge

The mailing system will soon allow its users to send emails as attachments without having to forward or download them first. Or as Google puts it, “You can now attach emails to other emails in Gmail.”

Fervent emailers can attach as many emails, which will appear as an .eml file, as they like. Users who love to have multiple tabs open may also be pleased to hear that the attachment will open in a new window.

Source: Gmail will now let you attach emails to your emails – The Verge

Using A Dedicated Gmail Account for Note-Keeping

I have been exploring the various note keeping applications (Google KeepZoho NotebookSimplenote, and Standard Notes ) and thought I had settled on Microsoft OneNote; then, the light bulb went off. Back in August 2019, I had posted an article I had composed titled, “Quick Tip: How To Turn A Gmail Account Into A Powerful Note-Taking And Note-Keeping App“. Folks, what I posted in that article about using a separate Gmail account (from your normal email account) as a note-keeping and note-taking app really does work.

The key is: Use this separate account for note and document storage only; not for email. The most important thing in doing this is to use the tagging feature in Gmail to categorize your notes (see screenshot below). You can let your imagination fly by using all the powerful features associated with Gmail (especially the search function). In the end, I created a cross-platform note-keeping and note-taking app that works hand in hand with all the Google services, on all device platforms, with 15GB of storage; ALL, for FREE.  I even prettied up my creation with a theme (that is an option that is built into the Gmail platform). The real beauty is that I can send anything to this Gmail note-keeping account from my phone, my browser and from my main email; then, organize the content accordingly.

Screenshot of my
Gmail Note-Keeping App

Source: This article is an excerpt from Today at What’s On My PC – November 18, 2019

The “Dark Theme” Option Is Coming To Gmail (for Android and iOS) – Here is how to activate it…

Per a GSuite blog update, it may take a while (up to 15 days) before you see it on your device(s).

Below is how to enable dark mode in Android and iOS.

How to enable dark theme in Gmail on Android: 

  • To enable dark theme on Android 10:
    • In your Android Display system setting, set your device to Dark theme—Gmail will automatically respect the system default setting.
    • On Pixel, when Battery Saver is enabled, Gmail will default to Dark theme automatically.
    • Or, in Gmail go to Settings > Theme and select “Dark”.

How to enable Dark theme in Gmail on iOS: 

  • For iOS 11 or 12, enable Dark theme by going to Settings > Dark Theme.
  • To enable dark theme on iOS 13, you can:
    • Set your device to dark theme in iOS Settings, and Gmail, by default, will automatically respect the system default setting.
    • Or, in Gmail go to Settings > Theme and select “Dark”.

Source: G Suite Updates Blog: Dark theme is coming to Gmail for Android and iOS


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Quick Tip: Four “Must Learn” Gmail Search Operators

I have been using Gmail since its’ inception and as a result, I literally have thousands of email that have accumulated in the account. Searching for a specific email in a sea of thousands of emails can be a daunting task. Many times I can simply enter the person’s name into the search box to find the email I am looking for; however, there are times where I need to use special search operators to quickly narrow down the result. This is where I have taught myself to use these four search operators to narrow down exactly what email I am looking for.

Specify the sender… 

from:
Example: from:amy

Specify a recipient…

to:
Example: to:david

Specify a recipient who received a copy…

cc:
bcc:
Example: cc:david

Words in the subject line…

subject:
Example: subject:dinner


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Quick Tip: How To Turn A Gmail Account Into A Powerful Note-Taking And Note-Keeping App

Evernote, OneNote, and SimpleNote are the note-taking apps that we all hear about. I have accounts with all three and have used them extensively; however, I just cannot get settled with any of them. I initially started out with a free Evernote account; then, Evernote ended up limiting what you could and could not do. OneNote, great note-taking app; however, I was never completely satisfied with the app, due to its’ slowness (in loading and performing searches). Simplenote, which is text-based only (with some markup language) is ok if all you want to do is save text-based notes.

After using all three of these, I kept thinking, there has to be a better way. This is when I came up with the idea of creating and using a separate Gmail account from my personal Gmail account to specifically store notes, documents, etc. Continue reading “Quick Tip: How To Turn A Gmail Account Into A Powerful Note-Taking And Note-Keeping App”

A New Gmail Feature Will Soon Be Checking Your Grammar

According to an article posted by Taylor Kerns, at Android Police, “Gmail will soon let you know just how bad your grammar sucks” with a new built-in grammar checker (and enhanced spellcheck that will auto-correct spelling errors). The rollout of these features are scheduled in September for G Suite users; with no rollout date set at this time for regular Gmail account users at home (like you and me). For us at home, be patient, it will come; and, when it does this will be a welcome addition.

Source: Android Police – Gmail will soon let you know just how bad your grammar sucks


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Quick Tip: How To Send (and Request) Money Using Gmail

Who would have ever thought you would be able to send (and receive) money using email. With Google’s Gmail, you can. When composing an email in Gmail, at the bottom, you will see a “$” sign. If you click on that “$’ sign you will be walked through the process of sending money where a Google Pay, Debit or Bank Account is required. You can send the money to any email recipient, does not have to be another Gmail account, and it is free so long as you have one of the three bank accounts as mentioned. The first time a recipient receives money through Gmail, they will need to add a debit card to transfer the money to. After that first time, whenever someone sends money through Gmail, it will automatically and seamlessly transfer to that card.  You can also “request” money using the Gmail ‘$” feature, as well.


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