Understanding Your Google Account Online Space Allocations (for Gmail, Google Drive and Google Photos)

When signing up for a Google account you get 15 GB of storage space in the cloud. That space is shared by Gmail, Google Drive and Photos. If you have a Google Account you can see what space these accounts are using by visiting google.com/settings/storage. Below is a screenshot of my account space allocations (after I had cleaned up things). If you notice I have 19 GB of storage. Somewhere along the line I had somehow acquired an additional 4 GB of space (to give me 19 GB, but I don’t remember what I did to get that).

Gmail will consume space if you send/receive a lot of email with attachments, but it takes years for see it is really impacting your allotted Google account space. I have been using Gmail since it inception (April 1, 2004) and I have used 9+ GBs. I will soon work on a strategy to backup those emails (to my computer) and back the account down to about a years worth of emails. Many people do not save emails, but I do. I will soon post an article on what you can do to backup your Gmail emails to your computer.

Google Drive, items that don’t take up space are: ​Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, Sites, and files in “Shared with me.” Other files that you store on Google Drive, such as PDF’s, videos, photos, and any file that is not a native Google file… are counted against your allotted space.

Google Photos is often the culprit of consuming Google Drive space because we take a lot of photos that auto upload from your smartphone; and, today’s smartphones take photos that are of “full resolution” quality that are large in file size. A workaround to this is that Google will allow you to store photos, unlimited for FREE, as long as you allow Google to take that “full resolution” quality photo and convert it to a “high quality” photo. To make sure you are allowing Google to make the conversion, on a computer, go to photos.google.com/settings. Make sure “High quality (free unlimited storage) is selected.

If you see that some of your photos is using space, you can click on “Recover Storage” and those photos that are accumulating space will be converted to “High quality” photos. I did this and took an hour or two before I noticed a difference in my drive space. I hadn’t even realized that I had photos (and videos) that were consuming drive space.

I hope what I posted here gives some insight on how Google manages and allocates your drive space. In summary, Gmail emails with large attachments will eat up space; files that are not created by or converted to the Google Doc file formats will eat up drive space; and, photos that you do not allow Google to convert to “high quality” will eat up drive space.


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What’s On My PC

What You Need To Do In Order to Save and Open Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Offline

The past several days here at “What’s On My PC” I have been focused on various office suites that are available for FREE for folks at home. Each of those suites requires software to be installed. Another, online option, that requires no installation, that I find many people at home overlook is Google Docs (which includes Google Docs, Sheets and Slides). You can do a lot with this office suite and you can even configure this office suite so that you can save and open your files, even when you are offline (not connected to the internet). The only requirement to turn “on” offline use is that you use the Google Chrome browser and install a browser extension (see instructions below).

Continue reading “What You Need To Do In Order to Save and Open Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Offline”

Here is How To Setup Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides For Offline Use

I find that most folks at home are unaware that Google has its’ own office suite that is FREE; and, can be used even when the computer is not connected to the internet (see setup instructions below). Why spend a ton of money on Microsoft Office when you are not a power user; you no longer need it for work or school; and, all you are doing is typing the occasional letter or even doing a basic spreadsheet? Also, the components of Google’s office suite does a pretty good job reading Microsoft Office files.

Google Docs Icons

Anyhow, if interested, here are the setup instructions on “How To Setup Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides For Offline Use” that I captured from Google’s support site. Continue reading “Here is How To Setup Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides For Offline Use”

How to Use Google Docs in Landscape | Tech Junkie

Google Docs is a powerful text editor. It is easy to use and has a pretty intuitive layout. It has many features and options routinely found in desktop word processors, which is pretty impressive considering it is a web-based app. The roster also includes the ability to change the page orientation. In this article, we’ll explore the Landscape side of Google Docs and take a closer look at other page setup options.

Page Setup Menu

Continue Reading @ Tech Junkie

Quick Tip: How to Copy a Google Keep Note Directly to Google Docs

by Spencer Depas @ Gadget Hacks

A nice side effect of moving a Keep note to Google Docs is that it makes the note easier to move to another platform. Once it’s saved as a Google Doc, you can export it as a Microsoft Word doc, a PDF, or even an ePUB. I’ve also found some situations where I wanted to de-clutter Google Keep, but I did not want to delete my potentially important note. In these cases, I will copy it to Google Docs and then delete the note on Google Keep.

Learn More @ Gadget Hacks


More “Quick Tips”

Quick Tip: Adding Fonts In Google Docs

To add additional fonts in Google Docs, above and beyond what you are seeing on the dropdown menu on the toolbar, simply click on “More fonts” and you will see that there are many more fonts to choose from (see illustrations below).

Quick Tip: Crop and Edit Images in Google Docs

You can crop and edit images in Google Docs. To do this, click on the image in your document, then click on the “Format” menu (at the top), and select “Image”. You will then find the cropping option as well as “Image Options” where you can perform recoloring and adjustments for transparency, brightness and contrast. “Reset” will return the image to its’ original format.

 

Google Docs will let you natively edit, collaborate on Microsoft Office files soon | The Verge

This is big news…

Editing Microsoft Office files in Google Docs is a pain. You can view them there, but you’ve previously had to convert them to Google’s format before you could edit, comment, and collaborate inside Docs. That’s about to change: Google just announced that it’s adding native support for Microsoft’s Word, Excel, and PowerPoint formats — like .docx, .xls, and .ppt — which will let you do real-time collaboration in Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides.

Source: Google Docs will let you natively edit, collaborate on Microsoft Office files soon – The Verge

Nice Intro To Using Google Docs In 11 Steps

If you are not familiar with Google Docs then take a look at these 11 Steps in using Google Docs. It is a good intro toward helping you understand that Google Docs may be all that you need when it comes to drafting your documents. It is like this… You can spend a great deal of money for Microsoft Office or you can go with Google Docs; which is FREE.  If you already have a Gmail account, then you are you are already set up to start using Google Docs right away.

Source: Using Google Docs: 11 Steps

Did you know you can “Voice Type” in Google Docs?

Google Docs is a very powerful word processor that is available (for FREE) to anyone who has a Google (Gmail) Account. One feature in Google Docs that you may be interested in trying is the “Voice Type” feature where you can type and edit by speaking. This feature not only works in Google Docs, but also works in the Google Slides speaker notes. Voice Type only works when opening Google Docs through the Google Chrome web browser and you will need a working microphone connected to your computer. The newer notebook PC’s have mic’s built in.

To try Voice Type, follow the instructions below:

  1. Turn on your microphone.
  2. Open a document in Google Docs.
  3. Click on “Tools”; then “Voice Typing” (a microphone box will appear)
  4. When you are ready to dictate or speak, click on the microphone icon.
  5. Speak clearly using a normal volume and speed.
  6. When done, click on the microphone icon.
  7. After you start voice typing, you can use commands to edit and format your document. For example, “Select paragraph,” “italics,” or “Go to the end of the line.” (Note: There are numerous commands you can use to edit and format a document.  To get a listing of these commands, “CLICK HERE“).

SOURCE: Google Docs

Here Is A GREAT “How To” On Posting From Google Docs To WordPress

I just posted (yesterday) about the Google Docs to WordPress.com add-on that allows you to draft a blog article using Google Docs and then send the draft of that article to your WordPress account for final review and publishing. Already today, I noticed that I Love Free Software drafted an excellent step-by-step instruction on “how to” post from Google Docs to WordPress (see source link below).

Learn how to post from Google Docs to WordPress.There is WordPress plugin that lets you export an article from Google Docs To the Draft Folder of your site.

Source: How To Post From Google Docs To WordPress

You Can Now Use Google Docs As A WordPress.com Editor

With the new Google Docs add-on you can now compose a WordPress blog article in Google Docs and send a draft directly to WordPress.com (or a Jetpack powered WordPress.org site). I am always looking for ways to post my blog articles and this add-on appears to make good use of Google Docs and its’ formatting options.

Source: WordPress

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