A Hack And Some Other Options To Help Reduce Your Satellite Broadband Data Usage With Windows 10

October 15, 2017

If you are using Windows 10, a “desktop computer” on an ethernet connection, and you are using a Satellite broadband service where there is a cap on your data usage, you may want to try this registry hack (see source link below) to help reduce your data usage. This hack fools a Windows 10 desktop computer into thinking it is on a metered connection. If you have a notebook computer on a wifi connection that is on Satellite broadband, this registry hack does not apply due that you have the option for a notebook computer (in the Windows 10 network settings) to meter the connection.

Also, anytime you go to edit the registry, always back the registry up. Failure to do so can cause your computer to malfunction. It is always best to find someone who is familiar with editing the registry.

Why we tried this registry hack…

When my parents, who have a desktop computer on a Satellite broadband connection, went from Windows 7 to Windows 10, we immediately noticed a dramatic increase in their data usage each month. This was due to Windows 10 capturing privacy data in the background (that can be turned off); due to the option where Windows 10 uses your computer to help update other computers on the internet (that can be turned off); the regular update cycle (that cannot be turned off, but can be set to occur during different hours); and the Windows 10 version updates that have occurred transparently on a regular basis (such as the Creator’s update and now the Fall Creator’s update).

In the end, what we are finding is that Windows 10, a desktop computer and a Satellite broadband connection are not a good mix. Our last option was to trick the desktop into thinking it is on a metered connection, as reflected in the Windows Central article. The downside of this is that not all the Windows updates will come through; except the Security updates. If I find that the connection continues to exceed the data limits, we are planning to look at a Chromebook or Chromebox and get away from Windows altogether.

If you are on a Satellite connection, please let me know your thoughts, suggestions, etc… on how to reduce data usage.


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Did you know you can “Voice Type” in Google Docs?

October 1, 2017

Google Docs is a very powerful word processor that is available (for FREE) to anyone who has a Google (Gmail) Account. One feature in Google Docs that you may be interested in trying is the “Voice Type” feature where you can type and edit by speaking. This feature not only works in Google Docs, but also works in the Google Slides speaker notes. Voice Type only works when opening Google Docs through the Google Chrome web browser and you will need a working microphone connected to your computer. The newer notebook PC’s have mic’s built in.

To try Voice Type, follow the instructions below:

  1. Turn on your microphone.
  2. Open a document in Google Docs.
  3. Click on “Tools”; then “Voice Typing” (a microphone box will appear)
  4. When you are ready to dictate or speak, click on the microphone icon.
  5. Speak clearly using a normal volume and speed.
  6. When done, click on the microphone icon.
  7. After you start voice typing, you can use commands to edit and format your document. For example, “Select paragraph,” “italics,” or “Go to the end of the line.” (Note: There are numerous commands you can use to edit and format a document.  To get a listing of these commands, “CLICK HERE“).

SOURCE: Google Docs


How To Setup AND Share A Google Calendar

August 11, 2017

My brothers and I have been in a situation where we are caring for our Father. We needed a way to schedule when we were available to assist with his care. What I did, since I have a Google account, was setup a calendar that could be shared with each of my brothers. In this case, each of us had a Google account which made setting this up all the more easier; PLUS I was able to give each brother rights to edit (add or delete) events on the calendar. You can also make the calendar public (with viewing rights only) for those who do not have an account or those who need to see the calendar. Setting this up literally took me less than 10 minutes.

Image result for google calendar

Here are the steps to setup and share a Google Calendar:

You can create a new calendar and invite other people to view or edit it. When you create an event, you’ll see an option to choose which calendar to add the event to.

  • On your computer, open Google Calendar. You can’t create or share calendars from the Google Calendar app.
  • On the left, next to “My Calendars,” click the Down arrow.
  • Click Create a new calendar.
  • Add the calendar name.  In my case, I named the calendar “Family”
  • Under “Share with specific people,” add the email address of the person you want to share with. This is where it is beneficial that each recipient has a Google account.
  • Under “Permission Settings,” choose an option in the drop-down menu. In my case, I selected the option “Make changes to events”; which allows the people you are sharing with to edit, add or delete events. They can also restore events from the trash that have been deleted.
  • If someone isn’t already added, click Add person.
  • Click Create calendar and you are done. Each recipient will receive an email to announce that a shared calendar has been created for which they can edit.

If you shared your calendar with an individual email address, they’ll see your calendar in their “Other calendar” list. If you shared your calendar with an email group , they’ll see the calendar in their “Other calendars” list once they click on the link in the email invitation from Google Calendar.

Important: To get your new calendar to show up on your Android phone or tablet, you’ll need to turn on sync for that calendar.


SOURCE: Google – Share Your Calendar With Someone

 


Need help installing a particular computer component? Here are links for each piece of hardware in your PC…

July 27, 2017

The links below are part of PCWorld’s recent post on “How To Build A PC”…

thinkstockphotos 101767870

How to avoid common PC building mistakes

How to install or replace a case fan

How to install a power supply in your computer

How to install an Intel or AMD CPU in your PC

How to install new memory in your PC

How to replace your PC’s motherboard

How to install a graphics card

How to install a hard drive in your PC

The ultimate guide to proper PC cable management

 Troubleshooting your home-built PC


SOURCE: PCWorld – How To Build A PC


How to remove the “FWD” in forwarded Gmails…

July 20, 2017

As I continue to work on my project of How To Use A Gmail Account To Create Your Own Customized Note-Taking App, I am sure learning a lot about Gmail. For example, I wanted to know if you can remove the “FWD” in the subject line in a forwarded Gmail? I could see where this could be useful; especially, when you don’t want the recipient (such as a customer) to know that it was an email you received from someone else and then forwarded it to them. In my case, where I am using one of my Gmail accounts exclusively as a note-taking app, by removing the “FWD” would help me clean up any notes I had edited (forwarded) and ultimately would give the appearance of a true note-taking app (such as Evernote, OneNote, and Simple Note).

After some exploring, I found that you can easily remove the “FWD”. You just have to look for it. When you forward a Gmail you will notice a small box (see screenshot) with an arrow pointing to the right (which indicates it is a forwarded Gmail) and beside that arrow, you will see a small arrow pointing downward. Click on that arrow and a drop-down menu will appear. On that menu, click on “Edit Subject”. After you click on “Edit Subject” you will be permitted to edit the subject of the email; for which you can remove the “FWD” and actually change the subject line to anything you want. Also, after you have completed editing the subject line, go into the body of the email and remove any other extraneous text that you typically would see in a forwarded email. Once you get this cleaned up, the recipient will never know the email was forwarded.

SOURCE: What’s On My PC – How To Remove The “FWD” In Forwarded Gmails


Quickly get started using Windows 10 features with the tips and tricks included in “Getting to know Windows 10 – for employees”

July 13, 2017

First saw this, “Getting to know Windows 10 – for employees”, at Major Geeks. It caught my attention and I explored further. This is a guide that may be helpful to my readers at home in exploring and learning about the features of Windows 10. The guide is available as a PDF or PPT (Powerpoint) — see source link below.

Getting to know Windows 10—for employees

SOURCE: Microsoft – Getting to know Windows 10 – for employees


How To Use A Gmail Account To Create Your Own Customized Note-Taking App

July 6, 2017

Evernote, OneNote, and SimpleNote are the note-taking apps that we all hear about. I have accounts with all three and have used them extensively; however, I just cannot get settled with any of them. I initially started out with a free Evernote account; then, Evernote ended up limiting what a free user could do. OneNote, great note-taking app; however, I was never completely satisfied with the app, due to its’ slowness (in loading and performing searches). Simplenote, which is text based only (with some markup language) is ok if all you want to do is save text-based notes.

After using all three of these, I kept thinking, there has to be a better way. This is when I came up with the idea of creating and using a Gmail account specifically for note-taking (or note keeping). Think about it. anything you find on the internet can be sent directly to a Gmail account; plus, on my Android phone, I can share (or send) just about anything to a Gmail account (i.e. scanned documents, photos, etc…). Gmail also has the labeling feature built-in where hierarchical note categories can be created (or labeled); plus, it has the ability to create rich text based notes (using the email editor). The real clincher with this is Gmail’s (Google’s) powerful search capabilities, 15GB of storage, and the ability to attach documents using Google Docs. I have been working with this idea and the key point in making it work is that the account should be strictly used for note-taking (or note keeping) purposes only; and, not for daily email purposes. In other words, my Gmail note-taking account is a completely separate account from my main Gmail account.

Below are the steps I took to create (in appearance) my own personal note taking (or note keeping) app using a Gmail account as the container to store stuff (notes, pics, docs, etc…) that are important to me. 

Step 1: Create a new account at Gmail.com. Give the account a name that you will recognize for note-taking purposes.

For example, “johndoe.notebook@gmail.com” …

Step 2: Once the account has been created, one of the first things I did was change the theme so that it stood out. Go to the “cogged gear” icon, at the top right side of the Gmail window and click on “Themes”. The theme I selected was one called “High Contrast”, which gives it the look of a note-taking (or note keeping) app — (see screenshot below).

Step 3: Go to the “cogged gear” icon and click on settings.

Step 4: Under the “General” tab, scroll down and turn the “Conversation View” to “off” and if you like, scroll down to “My Picture” and add a profile picture. In my case, I used a notebook icon. When done, scroll to the bottom and click on “save settings.

Step 5: Go back into the “Settings” and under the “Labels” tab, hide all labels with the exception of the “inbox” and “drafts” labels. Scroll down to the “Create Labels” section. This is where you can create your own label categories. You can always add or remove labels, in the future, from this section.

Step 6: Under the “Inbox” tab go to the categories section and “uncheck” the categories that are shown; then, scroll to the bottom and and click on “save settings”.

Step 7: Go back into the “Settings” and under the “Labs” tab scroll until you see “Preview Pane”. Once found, click on “Enable” to activate the “Preview Pane”; then, scroll down and click on “Save Settings” which will return you to the main Gmail screen.

Step 8: We’re almost done… Now that you have activated the “Preview Pane”, you will see a toggle icon (for the Preview Pane) with a down arrow. Click on the down arrow and select “vertical Split”.

After completing the aforementioned step, your Gmail note-taking app should look something like this:

Click Here For Larger View

When composing a new note, within your Gmail note-taking account, click on “Compose” to draft your note. When finished drafting your note send the note back to yourself. Once it lands in the inbox, assign a label to it. I also use my main everyday Gmail account and my Android Smartphone to send important stuff to my Gmail note-taking account. Another point to make is that I do not move anything from the inbox; unless, I am deleting (or archiving) a note

To draft an existing note, I search for the note, click on “Forward”, make my changes, then forward it back to my Gmail note-taking account; then, I delete the original. When I see that a note has FWD that tells me at one point it has been changed.

In the end, as I continue to work with this, I am finding that the concept of customizing and using a Gmail account as a note-taking app has far exceeded my expectations…